Poll

bestest circuit

galaxy M87 and its jet
shy white horses + MIA white horses
NGC 3808A and NGC 3808B (Arp 87 in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies)
Enceladus - fountains
Doyle Brunson - Is it really too unreasonable to suspect that such a highly sophisticated device as the human brain, during the intesity of concentrating in a big pot, could broadcast a simple message like a "Pair of Jacks" a mere eight feet?
Space tornadoes and Flux Transfer Events (FTE's)

Author Topic: If it is an Electric Universe there has to be circuits between everything  (Read 97275 times)

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
BLACK hole?
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2010, 08:48:10 »
BLACK hole?


BLACK hole? nothing can escape? companion star has 32 hour orbit period? nothing can escape a BLACK hole apart from light and x-rays etc (of course not created in the BLACK hole just happen to be created in its theoretical disk).

link to video clip of a BLACK hole Do you see a BLACK hole. Do you see a circuit powering something alive and bright? Notice the immense jet that come out of BLACK holes. How? The Theory that predicted BLACK holes predicted none of this. Yet the ideas/models we have now are still based on the original failed theory, they have modified a failed theory.




Quote


Astronomers have spied a star-sized black hole much further away than any such object previously known.

It has a mass 20 times that of our Sun and is sited six million light-years away in the galaxy NGC 300.

The discovery was made using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) facility on Mount Paranal in Chile.

The scientists' data indicates the object has a huge companion star that will, most probably, end its days as a black hole, too.

"In the time it's taken for the light to reach us from this galaxy, the companion star will have blown up in a supernova to produce its own black hole," said Professor Paul Crowther, from Sheffield University, UK, and the lead author of the scientific paper reporting the discovery.

"If you could instantly teleport yourself to that system right now, you'd presumable find a pair of black holes spiralling around each other," he told BBC News.

You can see a video of what this system looks like by going to the website of the European Southern Observatory organisation.

Black holes tend to come in two sizes. The super-massive variety is colossal and weighs a million to a billion times the mass of our Sun.

There is also the stellar-sized type, which may be 10 or so times the mass of our Sun, and result when really big stars exhaust their nuclear fuel at the end of their lives and collapse.

The new target falls into the latter category. It has a mass of about 20 times that of the Sun.

Astronomers have now found three black holes with masses more than 15 times that of the Sun, all of which are in galaxies outside our own.

The existence of the new one was first suspected through X-ray observations with the US space agency's Swift telescope and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton observatory.

"We recorded periodic, extremely intense X-ray emission, a clue that a black hole might be lurking in the area," explains team member Stefania Carpano from Esa.

Black holes are expected to pulse X-rays as they pull gas into themselves and tear it apart.

This was all confirmed when astronomers then followed up the Swift-XMM data with observations using the FORS2 instrument mounted on the 8.2m Antu unit of the VLT.

The instrument can pick apart fine details in light at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

"We took spectra of the companion star regularly, every night over the course of a couple of weeks, and we saw a feature in the companion star that basically 'wobbles'," said Professor Crowther.

"We get a blue shift and a red shift in the light as the star goes around the black hole."

The pair sweep about each other with a period of just 32 hours. If sited in our Solar System, this action would take place inside what is the orbit of Mercury.

The companion is something astronomers call a Wolf-Rayet star - a giant, hot, highly-evolved star that is billowing gas into space.

A lot of this material is presumably being pulled onto the black hole.

Only one other binary comprising a black hole and a Wolf-Rayet star has previously been seen.

Assuming the Wolf-Rayet arrives at the denouement expected for a star of its size, the system will then become a binary comprising two coalescing black holes.

In time, these holes would merge, emitting copious amounts of energy in the form of gravitational waves.

These ripples in the fabric of space-time are an inevitable consequence of the theory of general relativity, and their first detection is being sought by intricate laser experiments set up in science labs across the world.

Merging black holes are considered one of the most promising targets for these experiments.

"What's not really known is the statistics of binary black holes - we don't know how many there are. This gives us a hint there might be a certain number because this system is a progenitor to binary black holes."

Professor Crowther and colleagues will publish their findings in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
'Farthest' star-mass black hole | news.bbc.co.uk

Quote
This artist’s impression depicts the newly discovered stellar-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 300. The black hole has a mass about twenty times the mass of the Sun and is associated with a Wolf–Rayet star; a star that will become a black hole itself. Thanks to the observations performed with the FORS2 instrument mounted on ESO’s Very Large Telescope, astronomers have confirmed an earlier hunch that the black hole and the Wolf–Rayet star dance around each other in a diabolic waltz, with a period of about 32 hours. The astronomers also found that the black hole is stripping matter away from the star as they orbit each other. How such a tightly bound system has survived the tumultuous phases that preceded the formation of the black hole is still a mystery.
video of the BLACK hole | eso.org
« Last Edit: January 29, 2010, 09:44:21 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
Pair of Quasars - circuit or Galactic collision?
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2010, 21:29:29 »
Pair of Quasars - circuit or Galactic collision?


SDSS J1254+0846: Quasar Pair Captured in Galaxy Collision

Galactic Collision or circuit power what ever Quasars are?

Quote
Quasars: Massive or Charged?

 Consensus theories of the cosmos presume that mass is the fundamental quality with which to explain phenomena. For example, quasars are considered to be massive accretions of matter into supermassive black holes at a galaxy’s nucleus.
Because mass attracts mass, astronomers easily imagine that galaxies attract galaxies and that collisions, mergers, and tidal disruptions are common. Merging galaxies should massively increase the matter accreting into their nuclear black holes, and so astronomers expected to see many binary quasars among the collisions. Until recently, they have been disappointed.

However, a new series of images has found two close quasars in the midst of two close galaxies with distorted tails (image above). The tails could be nothing other than tidal disruptions from the merging of the galaxies, and the quasars are therefore indisputable confirmation of consensus theory. Should anyone have any doubts, a computer simulation of merging galaxies has “corroborated this conclusion.” “The model verifies the merger origin for this binary quasar system,” averred the model-maker.
Consensus, of course, being a massive merger of opinion, seldom takes notice of wisps of dissent. But those who read marginalia will spot a few disagreements. ‘To corroborate’ appears to mean ‘to program a computer with the same assumptions used to interpret observations and to generate features similar to the observations.’ (But what else can you do with an object that’s so far away you can’t stick your thumb in the pie to test it as Jack Horner did?) “The model verifies the merger” is one of those wheels of logic that provides exercise for astrophysical gerbils.

Another comment questions the certainty that “tails…are a sure sign…of an ongoing galaxy merger.” One can be sure of any belief merely by pumping up one’s fervency. But a scientific theory should be instead reliable, which requires alternative theories to be sought out and tested as well: What else could the phenomenon be under other assumptions? The consensus theories appear to produce excuses instead of tests. Readers of this site will likely think of several alternatives that could provide tests for reliability of the “sure signs.”
The Electric Universe is one of several alternative plasma theories that presume charge is the fundamental quality with which to explain phenomena. It takes a hint provided at the end of the press release (first link above) that “the galaxy disks both appear to be nearly face-on to Earth” and “the X-rays from Chandra show no signs of absorption by intervening gas or dust.”

In the Electric Universe, quasars are plasmoids ejected, usually along the spin axis, from a plasma focus mechanism in a galaxy’s nucleus. A face-on disk means that we are looking ‘down the barrel.’ An ejected quasar would appear projected against the galaxy’s core. It would be interesting to obtain a spectrum of the tails apart from the central quasars to see if they have a lower redshift. If they do, this would be another instance of a higher-redshift quasar in front of a lower-redshift galaxy.

Of course, the two quasars may instead be part of a fragmented ejection (from an active galaxy outside the field of view) and are starting to evolve into companion galaxies. After all, they lie on the eastern edge of the Virgo Cluster, where much ejection activity is occurring.
Quasars: Massive or Charged? | thunderbolts.info/tpod
« Last Edit: February 12, 2010, 21:35:23 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
Tropical Cyclones Tomas and Ului. Electric Universe = scalability
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2010, 17:01:15 »

Tropical Cyclones Tomas and Ului.  Electric Universe = scalability

One of the main mantras of the Electric Universe Theory is that things are scalable, from Tropical Storms (Hurricanes) to spiral galaxies


Tropical Cyclones Tomas and Ului


spiral galaxy pair NGC 3808A and NGC 3808B (Arp 87 in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies)

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
Hot Jupiters and electric resistance/circuits
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2010, 03:43:26 »


Hot Jupiters and electric resistance/circuits

Quote
Electric Resistance May Make Hot Jupiters Puffy

One of the surprises coming from the discoveries of the class of exoplanets known as “Hot Jupiters” is that they are puffed up beyond what would be expected from their temperature  alone. The interpretation of these inflated radii is that extra energy must be being deposited in the regions of the atmosphere with large amounts of circulation. This extra energy would be deposited as heat, causing the atmosphere to expand. But from where was this extra energy coming? New research is suggesting that ionized winds passing through magnetic fields may create this process.

Magnetic fields on Jovian type planets is no new news. Our own Jupiter has the strongest in the solar system with a strength 14 times greater than Earth‘s. The large magnetosphere created by this extends as far as 7 million kilometers towards the Sun and is stretched nearly the distance to Saturn‘s orbit. The interaction of charged solar particles with such an immense field creates gigantic aurora, similar to those on Earth.

Hints of magnetic fields on extra solar planets have been discovered as well. In 2004, a team lead by Evgenya Shkolnik, of the University of British Columbia reported detection of the effects of a planet’s magnetic field on its parent star by observing the extra energy this magnetic field returned to its parent star. The interaction excited transitions in the familiar Calcium H & K lines that were locked in phase with the planet‘s orbit. Follow-up observations including other Hot Jupiters confirmed the presence of planetary magnetic fields acting on their parent stars although none have yet suggested just how strong these fields might be.

The new research, linking magnetic fields with planetary radius, was first started in February of 2010 by a team led by Rosalba Perna of the University of Colorado in Boulder. In it, they demonstrated that the interaction of winds in the atmospheres of these planets could experience significant drag as they passed through the magnetic field lines due to their partially ionized nature. In May, Batygin & Stevenson of the California Institute of Technology suggested that this friction may induce heating sufficient to puff the planet up. Perna’s team picked up from the hypothetical basis and put Batygin’s & Stevenson’s idea to the test of a simulation. The simulation used a range of field strengths but found that for Hot Jupiters with strengths greater than 10 Gauss, were sufficient to explain the increased size.

But is this field strength truly plausible? Many astronomers seem to think so and the literature is filled with expectations of large magnetic fields for these planets although nothing seems to suggest that field strength has ever been measured on any planets outside our solar system to support this. Jupiter’s magnetic field strength ranges from 4.2 – 14 Gauss, putting the value of 10 Gauss in the possible range. However, work by Sanchez-Lavega of the University of the Basque Country in Spain, has suggested that as planets become tidally locked their magnetic field strengths decrease. For Hot Jupiters, he suggests that older planets of this type may have their magnetic fields reduced to a measly 1 Gauss. This may suggest an explanation for why experiments designed to search for fields on extrasolar planets through their radio emissions have failed.

Regardless, future simulations will undoubtedly take place and additional observations may help constrain the plausibility of this electromagnetic swelling.
Electric Resistance May Make Hot Jupiters Puffy | universetoday.com


electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
Electric circuit between Saturn and Enceladus, Jupiter and its moons
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2011, 21:16:50 »

Electric circuit between Saturn and Enceladus, Jupiter and its moons

There is a flow of electrons between Saturn and its moon Enceladus, similar to Jupiter and its moons. What in a gravity universe could cause that? Unless it is an Electric Universe. For it to be an Electric Universe there must be a circuit or connection between everything.

This BBC report even uses the phrase electrical circuit!

Quote

Saturn enjoys a flickering "Northern Lights" phenomenon thanks to a flow of electrons to and from its moon Enceladus, researchers say.

A report in Nature suggests these aurora would be faint, and in the ultraviolet part of the light spectrum.

The find by the Cassini spacecraft is similar to the electrical "circuit" between Jupiter and three of its moons.

Electrons flow to and from Enceladus' poles in a vast loop, and aurora result where they hit Saturn's magnetic field.

The aurora creation process is similar to that which happens at high latitudes on Earth; here, the paths of fast-moving charged particles from the solar wind are curved by the Earth's magnetic field and emit the displays we know as the Northern and Southern lights.

In contrast, the fields created by Jupiter and Saturn envelop the planets' moons, and what is known as electrodynamic coupling brings particles directly from the moons, completing what is actually an electrical circuit.

The mechanism behind Jupiter's aurora is presumed to be sulphur from its moon Io's volcanic activity, split by sunlight into electrons and ions.

On Saturn's moon Enceladus, however, the suspected source of electrons is "cryovolcanism" - volcanic activity that shoots up liquids or, in Enceladus' case, salty ice.

'Rare opportunity'

Saturn and its rings Last year, the Cassini mission was extended to 2017

The Cassini spacecraft has been studying Saturn and its moons since it arrived in 2004, having made 12 close passes of Enceladus.

On the close encounter that occurred on 11 August 2008, scientists detected a great stream of ions (molecules with electrons removed) coming from the moon.

Lead author of the study Abigail Rymer of Johns Hopkins University confirmed that the ions were associated with the vast electron loops.

"I immediately pulled up the electron data and, sure enough, there was a very strong electron beam propagating away from Saturn toward Enceladus," Dr Rymer said.

"It was actually a fairly rare opportunity to capture that, since when Cassini flies close to a moon we are generally looking at the moon -- not away from it."

The team was able to collect images of the point where the loops re-enter Saturn's magnetic field, interacting with it to form aurora.

"I think it's a very exciting, very interesting discovery," said Andrew Coates, a co-author of the paper from University College London.

"Five or six years ago we didn't know that Enceladus was putting any material into the Solar System - now we get exciting effects like these magnetic and electric current links into the ionosphere of Saturn, producing this (aurora) spot," he told BBC News.

The team says that the aurora are about a tenth the intensity of those seen on Jupiter, and that they vary widely in intensity - by as much as a factor of three.

That, they assume, is down to variations in the output of the geysers that are feeding the process - a process that Professor Coates says seems likely to be happening elsewhere.

"It's probably a universal process; it could be something that's happening in other places like [Neptune's moon] Triton, or extrasolar planets where there are 'hot Jupiters'."
Aurora from Saturn moon 'circuit' | bbc.co.uk


electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
interacting galaxies Arp 273 - a telltale sign of interaction
« Reply #20 on: April 29, 2011, 17:45:23 »

interacting galaxies Arp 273 - a telltale sign of interaction


interacting galaxies Arp 273

Quote
A Galactic Rose Highlights Hubble's 21st Anniversary

In celebration of the 21st anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope's deployment into space, astronomers pointed Hubble at an especially photogenic group of interacting galaxies called Arp 273.

This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a group of interacting galaxies called Arp 273. The larger of the spiral galaxies, known as UGC 1810, has a disc that is tidally distorted into a rose-like shape by the gravitational pull of the companion galaxy below it, known as UGC 1813. The swathe of blue jewels across the top is the combined light from clusters of intensely bright and hot young blue stars. These massive stars glow fiercely in ultraviolet light.

The smaller, nearly edge-on companion shows distinct signs of intense star formation at its nucleus, perhaps triggered by the encounter with the companion galaxy.

A series of uncommon spiral patterns in the large galaxy are a telltale sign of interaction. The large, outer arm appears partially as a ring, a feature that is seen when interacting galaxies actually pass through one another. This suggests that the smaller companion actually dived deeply, but off-centre, through UGC 1810. The inner set of spiral arms is highly warped out of the plane, with one of the arms going behind the bulge and coming back out the other side. How these two spiral patterns connect is still not precisely known.

A possible mini-spiral may be visible in the spiral arms of UGC 1810 to the upper right. It is noticeable how the outermost spiral arm changes character as it passes this third galaxy, from smooth with lots of old stars (reddish in colour) on one side, to clumpy and extremely blue on the other. The fairly regular spacing of the blue star-forming knots fits with what is seen in the spiral arms of other galaxies and can be predicted from the known instabilities in the gas contained within the arm.

The larger galaxy in the UGC 1810-UGC 1813 pair has a mass that is about five times that of the smaller galaxy. In unequal pairs such as this, the relatively rapid passage of a companion galaxy produces the lopsided or asymmetric structure in the main spiral. Also in such encounters, the starburst activity typically begins earlier in the minor galaxy than in the major galaxy. These effects could be due to the fact that the smaller galaxies have consumed less of the gas present in their nucleus, from which new stars are born.

Arp 273 lies in the constellation Andromeda and is roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth. The image shows a tenuous tidal bridge of material between the two galaxies that are separated by tens of thousands of light-years from each other.
A Galactic Rose Highlights Hubble's 21st Anniversary | sciencedaily.com

cigarshaped

  • asteroid/comet
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • EUreka?: +0/-0
The evidence displayed here is fantastic and my only comment is that a common question asked is "Where is the power source?". For me it is fairly obvious that plasma in space provides such a good conductor of electricity that we haved a lossless sytem, continuously circulating current through invisible Birkeland current filaments, tubes, etc. An initial 'spark' was all that is needed to provide energy which cannot be destroyed.

Each galactic system concentrates and distributes its energy supply through component parts, with no losses.

Does anyone disagree?

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
Filaments of Galaxies
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2011, 16:25:03 »

Filaments of Galaxies




If it is an Electric Universe then you would expect the Universe to reflect this. If it is a Gravity Universe then you would expect the Universe to reflect that.

The actual story here is interesting in that it mentions Filaments of Galaxies, perhaps the largest structures in the Electric Universe. They span mind blowing distances. How is that possible due to gravity?


Quote

SYDNEY (AFP) – A 22-year-old Australian university student has solved a problem which has puzzled astrophysicists for decades, discovering part of the so-called "missing mass" of the universe during her summer break.

Undergraduate Amelia Fraser-McKelvie made the breakthrough during a holiday internship with a team at Monash University's School of Physics, locating the mystery material within vast structures called "filaments of galaxies".

Monash astrophysicist Dr Kevin Pimbblet explained that scientists had previously detected matter that was present in the early history of the universe but that could not now be located.

"There is missing mass, ordinary mass not dark mass ... It's missing to the present day," Pimbblet told AFP.

"We don't know where it went. Now we do know where it went because that's what Amelia found."

Fraser-McKelvie, an aerospace engineering and science student, was able to confirm after a targeted X-ray search for the mystery mass that it had moved to the "filaments of galaxies", which stretch across enormous expanses of space.

Pimbblet's earlier work had suggested the filaments as a possible location for the "missing" matter, thought to be low in density but high in temperature.

Pimbblet said astrophysicists had known about the "missing" mass for the past two decades, but the technology needed to pinpoint its location had only become available in recent years.

He said the discovery could drive the construction of new telescopes designed to specifically study the mass.

Pimbblet admitted the discovery was primarily academic, but he said previous physics research had led to the development of diverse other technologies.

"Whenever I speak to people who have influence, politicians and so on, they sometimes ask me 'Why should I invest in physics pure research?'. And I sometimes say to them: 'Do you use a mobile phone? Some of that technology came about by black hole research'.

"The pure research has knock-on effects to the whole society which are sometimes difficult to anticipate."


Aussie student finds universe's 'missing mass' | news.yahoo.com

electrobleme

  • Administrator
  • Plasma Star
  • *****
  • Posts: 1501
  • EUreka?: +1/-0
  • It's time to step out of the Gravity, Well?
    • Electric Universe theory blog
bacteria electric cables and circuits - Desulfobulbaceae
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2012, 01:57:04 »
bacteria electric cables and circuits - Desulfobulbaceae

Scientists have found that living bacteria in the mud in the deep ocean floors connects up to make living bacteria electric cables and circuits! The Desulfobulbaceae bacteria connect up to make chains that conduct electricity along bio electric cables over a centimeter long.



Quote
They appear to consist of single cells and provide energy by linking the oxygen reservoir at the surface of the mud with hydrogen sulphide deep below.

These cables can stretch to around a centimetre in length, connecting the deepest bacteria living in low oxygen conditions with those in high oxygen areas.

A cubic centimetre of sediment can contain up to a kilometre of compacted cable with the bacterial colony monopolising sulphide oxidation in the soil, preventing other microbes from using the resource.

She said the report adds to a growing body of evidence highlighting the crucial role microbial electron transfer has in global geochemical processes and in the functioning of ecosystems.
Bacteria living in sediment on the ocean floor survive by becoming 'living power cables', new study claims | dailymail.co.uk

Will the circuits and wiring also be another layer in the earth as a step up or step down transformer?



Desulfobulbaceae - electrical designed bacteria

The article called Bacteria unite to form living electric cables that stretch for centimetres in the discover magazine has a fantastic description of the electrical bacteria known as Desulfobulbaceae

Quote
The bacteria are members of a family called Desulfobulbaceae, but their genes are less than 92 percent identical to any of the group’s known members. “They’re so different that they should probably be considered a new genus,” says Nielsen. They’re only found in oxygen-starved mud, but where they exist, there’s a lot of them. On average, Pfeffer found 40 million cells in a cubic centimetre of sediment, enough to make around 117 metres of living cable.

Under an electron microscope, the team saw that the cable bacteria have a set of 15 or 17 ridges running along their length. In cross-section, they look like gears. The bacteria also seem to share an outer membrane, which extends over the entire filament, like skin draped over sausage links. Nielsen thinks that the ridges are channels for sending electrons from one cell to another, and the shared membrane acts as an insulating sheath. “They compare very well with our electric cables,” he says.

But that’s just a guess. It’s not clear what the ridges are made of, but Nielsen is trying hard to find out how exactly the bacteria are channelling their electrons. That’s just one of many unanswered questions. How do the bacteria organise themselves in a neat vertical line? Do they get parasitised by other species that steal their electrons? What do the cells in the middle of the chain get out of their arrangement? How do the cells divide so that the filaments don’t break?

And how common are they? “They seem to be the optimal organism in any place where you become short of oxygen,” says Nielsen. “Why are they not everywhere? Or are they everywhere?”

Bacteria unite to form living electric cables that stretch for centimetres | discovermagazine.com