Nanodiamonds Dipoles

Nanodiamond dipoles in space dusty plasmas, near plasmoid stars, with these diamond nanodipoles emitting electric dipole radiation?

In astronomy, nanodiamonds are special because their structure produces what is known as a ‘dipole moment’ — an arrangement of atoms that allows them to emit electromagnetic radiation when they spin.

Because these particles are so small they are able to spin exceptionally fast, emitting radiation in the microwave range rather than in the meter-wavelength range, where galactic and intergalactic radiation would probably drown it out.
Astronomers Find Rapidly Spinning Nanodiamonds in Dust Disks around Young Stars | sci-news

Nanodiamonds dipoles electric universe

Nanodiamond dipoles and Anomalous Microwave Emission

Nanodiamonds likely form out of a superheated vapor of carbon atoms in highly energized star-forming regions. This is not unlike industrial methods of creating nanodiamonds on Earth...

Professor Scaife, Dr. Greaves and their colleagues found that nanodiamonds (particularly hydrogenated nanodiamonds, those bristling with hydrogen-bearing molecules on their surfaces), which form naturally within protoplanetary disks and are found in meteorites on Earth, are the most likely source of AME light.
Astronomers Find Rapidly Spinning Nanodiamonds in Dust Disks around Young Stars | sci-news

Several interstellar environments produce anomalous microwave emission (AME), with brightness peaks at tens-of-gigahertz frequencies. The emission’s origins are uncertain; rapidly spinning nanoparticles could emit electric-dipole radiation... Using spectroscopy, the nanodiamonds are located close to the host stars, at physically well-constrained temperatures
Anomalous microwave emission from spinning nanodiamonds around stars