Water asteroids, what are asteroids?

Another Kuiper Belt asteroid discovered with, in theory, only what can be water transformed physical features, to go along with the mighty Vesta.

Asteroid 2004 EW95 is a very unusual carbon KBO but scientific analysis has suggested clay on its surface as well as other watery minerals. Water on asteroids, what are asteroids?

Most objects in this region of space have ice-rich surfaces. This asteroid, known as 2004 EW95, is not just carbon-rich but also contains minerals known as phyllosilicates - a family which includes clay and talc.

"The features that we see occur in asteroids that have had their rocks altered by the presence of liquid water," Seccull explains. "Because [2004 EW95] is so far away from the Sun, it's about -235C, so all the water on its surface is going to be frozen."

... Seccull says that there are more objects in the Kuiper Belt that appear to be similar to 2004 EW95, but it is very difficult to get enough detail.
Lonely asteroid tells Solar System story | BBC

asteroids 2004 EW95 water Vesta

Wet asteroids

What could the watery material on the asteroid imply? Wetter asteroids, what are asteroid?

  • Asteroids have more water history than science previously thought
  • Asteroids are parts of former asteroids, moons, planets
  • The surface material has been transformed by a close encounter with the sun. What was its surface like before
  • Electric Universe geology has transmuted the chemical elements in situ
  • Asteroids have more water like, in theory, comets. More evidence that comets and asteroids are similar?

More evidence for Worlds in Collision?

Yet more evidence, in Grand Tack theory, for planetary chaos, similar to Immanuel Velikovsky's Worlds in Collision?

"The features that we see occur in asteroids that have had their rocks altered by the presence of liquid water," Seccull explains. "Because [2004 EW95] is so far away from the Sun, it's about -235C, so all the water on its surface is going to be frozen." This implies it's actually been heated at some point, and could have formed closer to the Sun."

One model of Solar System formation, known as the grand tack, proposes that the early Solar System was quite a rowdy neighbourhood - with Jupiter and Saturn first migrating towards the Sun, then moving back out to their current position.

This process would have scattered some early bodies that formed amongst the gas giants into the outer reaches of the solar system... where they could remain today.
Lonely asteroid tells Solar System story | BBC