Occam’s L3 modern humans

Occam’s L3 modern humans

If you need to conjure Back To Africa Migration L3 Eve, combined with always earlier and more anatomically modern human mass migrations Out Of Africa II and III, then your theories are not really predicting successfully.

These Y chromosome sequences now provide new evidence that Neandertals and early modern humans met and exchanged genes before the major out of Africa migration – potentially as early as 370,000 years ago and certainly more than 100,000 years ago.

This implies that some population closely related to early modern humans must already have been in Eurasia at that time.

Surprisingly, this interbreeding resulted in the replacement of the original Neandertal Y chromosomes with those of early modern humans, a pattern similar to what has been seen for Neandertal mitochondrial DNA in an earlier study.

At first, the complete replacement of both Y chromosomes and mtDNA of early Neandertals was puzzling, as such replacement events are quite unlikely to occur by chance alone. However, the researchers used computer simulations to show that the known …
Y chromosomes of Neandertals and Denisovans now sequenced | Max Planck Institute

Something like Occam’s L3 tribes already populating the world? Or local tribal DNA adapting to the environment?

L3 evolution out of Africa migration

In the 2010s, studies in population genetics uncovered evidence of interbreeding that occurred between H. sapiens and archaic humans in Eurasia, Oceania and Africa, indicating that modern population groups, while mostly derived from early H. sapiens, are to a lesser extent also descended from regional variants of archaic humans.
Recent African origin of modern humans | Wikipedia

multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis Franz Weidenreich

Back Migration of L3 Females or Asian Origin?

You don’t even need L3, just variations of the basic human model. Living at different electromagnetically catastrophic times where uniformitarianism dating and life can be rapidly transformed and transmutated.

L3 is the haplogroup from which all modern humans outside Africa derive. It is strongly associated with the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans of about 70–50,000 years ago. It is inherited by all modern non-African populations, as well as by some populations in Africa

The possibility of an origin of L3 already in Asia was also proposed by Cabrera et al. based on the similar coalescence dates of L3 and its Eurasian-distributed M and N derivative clades (ca. 70 kya), the distant location in Southeast Asia of the oldest subclades of M and N, and the comparable age of the paternal haplogroup DE.

According to this hypothesis, after an initial out-of-Africa migration of bearers of pre-L3 (L3’4*) around 125 kya, there would have been a back-migration of females carrying L3 from Eurasia to East Africa sometime after 70 kya.

According to other research, though earlier migrations out of Africa of anatomically modern humans occurred, current Eurasian populations descend instead from a later migration from Africa dated between about 65,000 and 50,000 years ago (associated with the migration out of L3).
Haplogroup L3 (mtDNA) | Wikipedia

Even though the EU is all about electromagnetic evolution during catastrophes it could be as simple as slight changes to the natural electrical energy in local areas, something like Rupert Sheldrake Morphic resonance. Why is there such an incredible divide of life at the Wallace Line?

Occam’s L3 modern humans

A third idea is even more radical. It emerged when Martinón-Torres and her colleagues compared more than 5,000 fossil teeth from around the world: the team found that Eurasian specimens are more similar to each other than to African ones.

That work and more recent interpretations of fossil skulls suggest that Eurasian hominins evolved separately from African ones for a long stretch of time. The researchers propose that the first hominins that left Africa 1.8 million years ago were the eventual source of modern humans.

Their descendants mostly settled in the Middle East, where the climate was favourable, and then produced waves of transitional hominins that spread elsewhere. One Eurasian group went to Indonesia, another gave rise to Neanderthals and Denisovans, and a third ventured back into Africa and evolved into H. sapiens, which later spread throughout the world.

In this model, modern humans evolved in Africa, but their immediate ancestor originated in the Middle East.
Fossil finds in China are challenging ideas about the evolution of modern humans and our closest relatives | Phys.org

back migration Out of Africa L3

This hypothesis attempts to explain why …

Wallace Line L3

This southern coastal dispersal would have occurred before the dispersal through the Levant approximately 45,000 years ago.

This hypothesis attempts to explain why haplogroup N is predominant in Europe and why haplogroup M is absent in Europe. Evidence of the coastal migration is thought to have been destroyed by the rise in sea levels during the Holocene epoch.

Alternatively, a small European founder population that had expressed haplogroup M and N at first, could have lost haplogroup M through random genetic drift resulting from a bottleneck (i.e. a founder effect).
Southern Route and haplogroups M and N – Recent African origin of modern humans| Wikipedia

Out of Africa II

Several expansions of populations of archaic humans (genus Homo) out of Africa and throughout Eurasia took place in the course of the Lower Paleolithic, and into the beginning Middle Paleolithic, between about 2.1 million and 0.2 million years ago (Ma). These expansions are collectively known as Out of Africa I, in contrast to the expansion of Homo sapiens (anatomically modern humans) into Eurasia, which may have begun shortly after 0.2 million years ago (known in this context as Out of Africa II).

The earliest presence of Homo (or indeed any hominin) outside of Africa dates to close to 2 million years ago.
Early expansions of hominins out of Africa | Wikipedia

excavations at a cave in Daoxian in China’s Hunan province have yielded 47 fossil teeth so modern-looking that they could have come from the mouths of people today. But the fossils are at least 80,000 years old, and perhaps 120,000 years old, Liu and his colleagues reported last year6. “Those early migrants may have interbred with archaic populations along the way or in Asia, which could explain Zhirendong people’s primitive traits,” says Petraglia.

… A third idea is even more radical. It emerged when Martinón-Torres and her colleagues compared more than 5,000 fossil teeth from around the world: the team found that Eurasian specimens are more similar to each other than to African ones. That work and more recent interpretations of fossil skulls suggest that Eurasian hominins evolved separately from African ones for a long stretch of time. The researchers propose that the first hominins that left Africa 1.8 million years ago were the eventual source of modern humans. Their descendants mostly settled in the Middle East, where the climate was favourable, and then produced waves of transitional hominins that spread elsewhere. One Eurasian group went to Indonesia, another gave rise to Neanderthals and Denisovans, and a third ventured back into Africa and evolved into H. sapiens, which later spread throughout the world. In this model, modern humans evolved in Africa, but their immediate ancestor originated in the Middle East.
Fossil finds in China are challenging ideas about the evolution of modern humans and our closest relatives | Phys.org

Since many birds do not cross even the shortest stretches of open ocean water

Wallace Line L3

The Wallace Line or Wallace’s Line is a faunal boundary line drawn in 1859 by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and named by English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley that separates the biogeographical realms of Asia and Wallacea, a transitional zone between Asia and Australia.

West of the line are found organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, a mixture of species of Asian and Australian origin is present. Wallace noticed this clear division during his travels through the East Indies in the 19th century.

The line runs through Indonesia, between Borneo and Sulawesi (Celebes), and through the Lombok Strait between Bali and Lombok. The distance between Bali and Lombok is small, about 35 kilometres (22 miles).

The distributions of many bird species observe the line, since many birds do not cross even the shortest stretches of open ocean water. Some bats have distributions that cross the line, but larger terrestrial mammals are generally limited to one side or the other;

Other groups of plants and animals show differing patterns, but the overall pattern is striking and reasonably consistent.
Wallace Line | Wikipedia