Norfolk

The problem of the Suffolk and Norfolk round towers

The problem of the Suffolk and Norfolk round towers

Another problem of East Anglia’s missing history are its puzzling and ancient round towered flint churches. Initially this appears to be a specifically Suffolk and Norfolk Norman architectural mystery, but other countries including Ireland have doubts about their variations of round towers. Who built them, exactly when and why? How can there be doubt with such unique buildings?

If this enigma is baffling enough for architect historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner to write about it in his Buildings of England books, then there is official lack of evidence.

The Norman conquest of East Anglia by the historic Pevsner Caveat

Sir Nikolaus Pevsner Architectural Guides Norman Saxon Churches of England

There is doubt for what is evidence of Early to Late Anglo-Saxon architecture and when did conquered rural areas start building in the Norman style? Very strangely for the land of the East Angles, with its unique and staggering amount of very old round towered flint churches, the interpretations of Saxon or Norman examples are still creating confusion.

Is this due to Sir Nikolaus Pevsner and should he be known as Norman Pevsner?

Who are ya! Who are ya! Ancient and Royal Norfolk is missing most of it’s history?

Ancient and Royal Norfolk’s missing history

The Norfolk dialect may be as broad as it’s history but like its pronunciation, old Norfolk is missing a lot of physical evidence they even existed.

The county loved by ancient civilisations, it was suggested that some these may have helped build early Stonehenge earthworks and white chalkworks. Those ruling the old Royal county of Norfolk also appreciating the magic of chalk streams, from whoever the Anglo-Saxons were, including Saint and King Edmund the Martyr, up to the present day British Monarch’s residence at Sandringham. As the King of Norfolk what would you build to rule your Kingdom from?

Stray animal Pounds in Somerleyton and Blundeston. And Gorleston?

Charles Dickens David Copperfield Blundeston Suffolk

Animal pounds, sheepfolds, pund, pinfolds were used to impound stray livestock in the Lord of the Manor’s official enclosure, often found on the local Pound Lane.

Blundeston Village Pound was an important part of Blundeston life. When livestock was moved from one pasture to another, or to market, it was done ‘on the hoof’. Sometimes a few would go astray and these would be impounded here. They were looked after by the pinder, who fed and watered them. A fee had to be paid on collection by the owner. This is the only public property The Lord of the Manor still retains in the village.

Righteous religious mob vandalism and mutilations

William Dowsing Oliver Cromwell Popish Practices

What was so wrong with Churches symbolism and why would ancient large stone crosses be mutilated in Gorleston-On-Sea?

” It is fortunate that any fragments to have survived, for during much of the 17th Century. Cromwell’s soldiers, led by the ferocious William Dowsing, did colossal damage to every form of religious imagery, smashing glass, defacing stone sculpture and firing at wooden roofs in an attempt to obliterate every bit of what they had considered to be the heathen elements of Christian worship. “