SIS Chronology & Catastrophism Review

Chronology & Catastrophism Review Society for Interdisciplinary StudiesThe Society's latest magazine is what you pay your annual membership for, it is awesome!

The Society for Interdisciplinary Studies investigates Immanuel Velikovsky inspired subjects such as Chronology Revisionism, Catastrophe, mythology and some of its members throw in a bit of Electric Universe theory now and again.

Every few months the large brown SIS envelope appears (or you can get a PDF version sent) and you wonder what mysteries it will contain and perhaps give a bit more understanding to.

The subjects and authors interests are so varied you have no clue what will be in it.

This Chronology & Catastrophism Review (2016:2) covers topics as varied:

  • Anomalies in Ancient Descriptions of the Sun-God (Ev Cochrane)
  • A Geomagnetic Approach to Traditions of Axis Mundi, Part 1 (Rens van der Sluijs)
  • The Writings of the Historians of the Roman and Early Medieval Periods and their Relevance to the Chronology of the First Millenium AD, Part 2 b (Trevor Palmer)
  • Alalakh and Chronology (Barry Curnock)
  • A Note on Plasmoids on the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Winston H Bostick (Robert J Johnson and Marinus Anthony van der Sluijs)

The extra bits in the SIS Review include book reviews which this time is a very positive review of Gary Gilligan's Extraterrestrial Sands investigation, recent news that relates to The Society's members studies and some discussion from its forum on The Battle of Kadesh.

For those more interested in the plasma and comparative mythology side of things in an Electric Universe then Rens article on the Axis Mundi is mind blowing. He even dares to question some of Anthony Peratts interpretations of the data from the petroglyphs and related matters.

And that is just in Part 1 so if you are not yet a member then sign up now to also get Part 2.

Ev Cochrane also writes an interesting article about the Sun God which really can help people to explore this subject further without having to waste time trying to work out what stuff to investigate.

The chronology articles are also good. If you don't understand them or their importance, give them a read to get the general idea of what its all about. But don't ask me any questions on it as I don't have a clue what these chronology scholars are on about but really appreciate their dedicated work and arguments (discussions).

If you are in Britain then The Society have their Autumn Meeting on Saturday 17th September, with videos and live video chat with Peter Jupp and Wallace Thornhill.