Out of Africa alternative theories

The standard ideas on modern human evolution - Out of Africa or recent African origin of modern humans theory - is not the only idea on how the very different humanoid forms evolved around the world.

Franz Weidenreich who died in 1948 suggested that the varying ancient races may have dipped into each others gene pools.

A 2017 study is now also suggesting that modern Homo sapiens were found around the world and lived at the same time, between 300,000 to 400,000 years ago.

Prof Stringer says it is not inconceivable that primitive humans who had smaller brains, bigger faces, stronger brow ridges and bigger teeth - but who were nonetheless Homo sapiens - may have existed even earlier in time, possibly as far back as half a million years ago. This is a startling shift in what those who study human origins believed not so long ago.
'First of our kind' found in Morocco | BBC

Out of Africa versus the multiregional hypothesis  Franz Weidenreich

Weidenreich pioneered the Polycentric (multiregional) hypothesis, which proposed that human populations have evolved independently in the Old World from Homo erectus to Homo sapiens sapiens, while at the same time there was gene flow between the various populations.
Weidenreich Theory of Human Evolution - Franz Weidenreich | Wikipedia

With more and more previously unknown and some very mysterious archaic Homo sapiens being discovered through fossils and dna interpretation, will the multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis eventually survive and be the fittest of the human evolutionary models? Or, at least, that the replacement hypothesis has viable alternatives?

Does the multiregional evolution idea help with some of the recent African origin model problems, especially the L3 puzzle?

Out of Europe or at least not out of Africa?

not Out of AfricaCharles Darwin believed that humans evolved in Africa, because that's where our closest ape relatives the chimpanzees and gorillas live ... The point of focus here is on two main questions. Precisely when did the human branch begin? And how would we recognise the earliest members of our kind from fossil bones? These two questions are clearly interdependent and surprisingly difficult to answer.

... Can DNA helps us out here? Sadly not. Geneticists can't agree on when the split occurred, with estimates ranging from 4 million to 12 million years ago. This leads many of us fossil boffins to conclude that genetic clocks simply aren't up to the task.

... These species are especially compelling candidates because there's a large number of bony features demonstrating bipedalism and various human-like dental traits. The cranium of Sahelanthropus even resembles members of genus Homo in several respects, which is a real surprise.

Then there are two fragments of bone from Kenya known about since the 1960s and 1980s which are at least 5 million years old. The jaws from Lothagam and Tabarin show similarities (especially in their teeth) to later members of the human line, but are too poorly known to provide anything firmer.

... Then there's Oreopithecus from Italy, also dated around 7 million years old, which is oddly human-like. In common with early African fossils and living humans, it shares features we would normally associate with bipedalism. Yet the remainder of its skeleton shows clearly that Oreopithecus is not very human-like, and is unlikely to be related to us at all.

... I'm open to the idea that early humans lived beyond Africa, but Graecopithecus falls well short of proving it.
Did humans evolve in Europe rather than Africa? We don't have the answer just yet | Phys org

Or just local variations of humans? Or rapidly changed/evolved from the other more standard/accepted models?

Very interestingly, while Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens were distinguished from one another by a suite of obvious anatomical features, archaeologically they were very similar.
Origins of Modern Humans: Multiregional or Out of Africa? | Action Bioscience

Not so modern humans and not so out of Africa

When did modern humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) first appear on planet Earth? Why did they?

not out of The idea that modern people evolved in a single "cradle of humanity" in East Africa some 200,000 years ago is no longer tenable, new research suggests. Fossils of five early humans have been found in North Africa that show Homo sapiens emerged at least 100,000 years earlier than previously recognised. It suggests that our species evolved all across the continent, the scientists involved say.

... "We are not trying to say that the origin of our species was in Morocco - rather that the Jebel Irhoud discoveries show that we know that [these type of sites] were found all across Africa 300,000 years ago,"

... "This shows that there are multiple places in Africa where Homo sapiens was emerging. We need to get away from this idea that there was a single 'cradle'."

And he raises the possibility that Homo sapiens may even have existed outside of Africa at the same time: "We have fossils from Israel that are probably the same age and they show what could be described as proto-Homo sapiens features."

Prof Stringer says it is not inconceivable that primitive humans who had smaller brains, bigger faces, stronger brow ridges and bigger teeth - but who were nonetheless Homo sapiens - may have existed even earlier in time, possibly as far back as half a million years ago. This is a startling shift in what those who study human origins believed not so long ago.
'First of our kind' found in Morocco | BBC

We identified a mosaic of features including facial, mandibular and dental morphology that aligns the Jebel Irhoud material with early or recent anatomically modern humans and more primitive neurocranial and endocranial morphology. In combination with an age of 315 ± 34 thousand years (as determined by thermoluminescence dating), this evidence makes Jebel Irhoud the oldest and richest African Middle Stone Age hominin site that documents early stages of the H. sapiens clade in which key features of modern morphology were established. Furthermore, it shows that the evolutionary processes behind the emergence of H. sapiens involved the whole African continent.
New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens

For those who interpret our history with a catastrophic viewpoint and not the old clockwork of a Newtonian solar system, the thermoluminescence dating has its own issues.