Author Topic: Exoplanets and outer planets  (Read 7999 times)

electrobleme

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Exoplanets and outer planets
« on: January 09, 2010, 18:38:33 »

exoplanets and outer planets/objects in our solar system


What and how many exoplanets will be discovered? Why are there so many super Jupiters that illogically in a Gravity Universe orbit so close to their star? What other outer planets/objects (Trans-Neptunian object) will we discover in our own solar system? Will we find another water planet like earth? If we do will this prove that the planet itself creates/transforms the water in an Electrical Universe?



« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 18:56:28 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Exoplanets and outer planets - index/list
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 19:26:45 »

List of exoplanets and outer planets


** Red Sedna - strange orbital object in our Solar System
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 21:10:09 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Red Sedna



Sedna - the reddest and furthest outer orbit object/planetoid in our Solar System

Sedna is the furthest orbiting object in our Solar System found so far. Red Sedna's orbit is strange and puzzling to astronomers and there are a number of fanciful theories about how and why it has its amazing orbit, why it is the reddest object in our Solar System and why it has such a long period or rotation of 20 days (although evidence in 2005 suggests a
10 hour rotation)

Quote

How big is Sedna?
This tells us that Sedna is at most about 1800 km in diameter: about halfway in size between Pluto and the largest known Kuiper belt object Quaoar. Even though all we know for certain is that Sedna is smaller than 1800 km, we have evidence which suggests that the size might be pretty close to this number. We are virtually certain that the size is larger than the 1250 km size of Quaoar, though this object has shown many unexpected characteristics, so we can't completely rule out a smaller size

What is Sedna made of?
We don't know. Because it's surface is relatively bright, from the thermal observations (see above), we might expect it to have water ice or methane ice like Charon and Pluto have. But observations from the Gemini Telescope and (in collaboration with Chris Koresko at JPL) the Keck telescope suggest that this is not true. From observations at the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope in Chile, we do know that Sedna is one of the most red objects in the solar system -- almost as red as Mars. Why? We're currently baffled.

Do we see a moon around Sedna?
When we first announced the discovery of Sedna, we noted that circumstantial evidence suggested that there is a moon around Sedna. Soon after, we acquired the images below with the Hubble Space Telescope . Much to our suprise no moon is visible!

Why did we think we would see a moon?
The evidence for the existence of a moon is circumstantial, but nonetheless compelling. The story is a little complicated, though, and it goes like this:

We have found that Sedna systematically gets a little brighter and a little fainter every 20 days or so (more complete information can be found here ). We think this is because there are bright and dark spots on the surface of Sedna and Sedna is rotating once every 20 days or so.

Most planets and asteroids rotate much more quickly. The earth rotates in 24 hours, Jupiter and Saturn rotate in about 10 hours, many asteroids rotate in just a handful of hours. Why is Sedna so different?
Sedna - gps.caltech .edu


Sedna's rotation period

If Sedna does rotate in under 10 hours (as suggested below), does not have a moon and Sedna still varies in brightness over 20 days then what does cause the variation?

Quote
We present precise, ~1%, r-band relative photometry of the unusual solar system object (90377) Sedna...These properties imply that the rotation period of Sedna is O(10 hours), cannot be < 5 hours, and cannot be >10 days, unless the intrinsic light curve has significant and comparable power on multiple timescales, which is unlikely...Our results indicate that the period of Sedna is likely consistent with typical rotation periods of solar system objects, thus obviating the need for a massive companion to slow its rotation.
On the Rotation Period of (90377) Sedna - arxiv .org



The strange orbit of Sedna and the orbit of planets in our inner/outer Solar System


Sedna's strange orbit

Does Sedna have a smaller orbiting object/moon companion, does it have a bright/dark side or is it a variation of a variable star in an Elecrtric Universe?

This paper suggests that the Sedna's period of rotation is between 5 hours and 10 days.

Quote
What is the Oort cloud and what is its relationship to Sedna?
The Oort cloud is a hypothetical shell of icy proto-comets in very loose orbits around the sun that extends to a distance of almost halfway to the nearest star. Occasionaly, passing stars cause a slight change in the orbit of one of these proto-comets which causes them to come steaking in to the inner solar system where we see them as comets. A nice explanation can be found  here. Though the Oort cloud has never been seen directly, the comets that we do see are very strong evidence of its existence. As can be seen in the graphic above, though, the Oort cloud is expected to be much much further out than the orbit of Sedna. So why do we think Sedna is a member of the Oort cloud? We believe that the existence of Sedna is evidence that the Oort cloud actually extends much further in towards the sun than previously thought. This "inner Oort cloud" was formed in the same manner as the previously known "outer Oort cloud." Early in the history of the solar system many many small icy bodies were orbiting the sun and getting sling-shot out by close encounters with planets. As they were travelling further and further from the sun, the orbits of these bodies were affected by distant stars, causing them to slow down and stay attached to the sun. Sedna probably suffered a similar fate, except the stars which affected it must have been much much closer than previously expected. We believe that this is evidence that the sun formed in a tight-knit group along with many other stars. .edu/~mbrown/sedna/]Sedna - gps.caltech .edu[/url]

Here we see astronomy at work. Ideas and theories backed up by other ideas that create a new standard model that has no real evidence apart from it fits the other ideas. The only facts in Oort Cloud section is that we have a Sun, Sedna is an object orbiting the Sun (we dont know what Sedna is exactly) and we have comets. The rest is a made up fairy tale.

If you clicked on the link then you would have read how these things dangerously grow until they are considered fact. Little mention is ever made that they are hypothetical (at least the quote above says it at the start) and they are written as if it is proven fact. Not just an astronomers wet dream to explain all the surprises that astronomers and scientists are always having.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 21:05:53 by electrobleme »