Author Topic: The moon  (Read 10210 times)

electrobleme

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The moon
« on: September 19, 2009, 00:30:50 »

The moon is an amazing object, so close to us, lifeless but with a few signs of electrical activity in its TLP's (Transient lunar phenomenon) and its "levitating" dust clouds.

Why is it so close to us and how can one side always remain facing us? Nothing in a Gravity Universe can really explain it. It appears to be connected to us and that is why the same side always faces us.

electrobleme

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The coldest spots found so far in the Solar System are on the Moon
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2009, 00:44:07 »
The cold side of the Moon



The coldest spots found so far on a planet in our Solar System are on the Moon, in the dark craters that are never hit by sunlight. Is this just due to that? Pluto which is slightly further away is not as cold.

Is it more due to how active a component in the Electric Universe circuit a planet or a moon is? Of course the darkness does help make these spots cold but the Moons Magnetosphere is not very strong.

Quote
"Most notable are the measurements of extremely cold temperatures within the permanently shadowed regions of large polar impact craters in the south polar region," said David Paige, UCLA professor of planetary science and principal investigator of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment. "Diviner has recorded minimum daytime brightness temperatures in portions of these craters of less than -238 degrees Celcius (-397 degrees Fahrenheit). These super-cold brightness temperatures are, to our knowledge, among the lowest that have been measured anywhere in the solar system, including the surface of Pluto."

"After decades of speculation, Diviner has given us the first confirmation that these strange, permanently dark and extremely cold places actually exist on our moon," said science team member Ashwin Vasavada from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Their presence greatly increases the likelihood that water or other compounds are frozen there. Diviner has lived up to its name."
NASA - New Temperature Maps Provide a 'Whole New Way of Seeing the Moon'


electrobleme

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Man made impacts on the Moon and the LCROSS mission
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2009, 00:54:26 »
Satellites impacting on the Moon - LCROSS double impact

There have been a few man made impacts on to the Moons surface. One of the earlier ones is said to have made the Moon "ring" or vibrate or over an hour. Some implied that this meant the Moon has to be hollow?

A recent one created a very bright flash and burst of EM waves, similar to the Comet Temple 1 and the Deep Impact although not as spectacular.  The Deep Impact appeared to prove the Electric Universe Theory was correct in some ways. There was a massive blinding electrical discharge between the Deep Impact copper projectile and Comet Temple 1. As predicted BEFORE the event by Wal Thornhill. No main stream scientist predicted anything like it because it was just a dirty snowball that was going to be hit.

To read what the Electric Universe Theory and Wal Thornhill predicted click here for his holoscience site (at the bottom of the page starting with "In future:")

There is to soon be more impacts on the moon with the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission. What will happen this time? Have the rockets not been in space or far enough away from the Moon/Earth to change charge enough, will the impact plume be more or less than what they are expecting?  What will happen as it is 2 impacts this time?




electrobleme

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Why did the Moon ring like a bell for 1 hour? What does it mean?

When the Apollo 12 Moon mission left the Moon the Intrepid's ascent stage section of the lunar module was dropped onto the Moon. seismographs installed by the Lunarnauts recorded that the Moon surprisingly vibrated like a bell for around an hour.


Full version of the article (from adsabs.harvard.edu) on the Apollo 12 Moon mission
and the result of its ascent stage Lunar Module hitting the Moon
and making it reverberate for around an hour.

What will happen when the Moon is struck this time by the LCROSS Moon impact mission, especially if it is going to be struck twice?

« Last Edit: September 19, 2009, 07:59:40 by electrobleme »