Author Topic: If humans could observe all electromagnetic wavelengths what would we see?  (Read 4847 times)

electrobleme

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If humans could observe all electromagnetic wavelengths what would we see?

What would our world, life and the universe look like if we could see the full range of the electromagnetic spectrum?

Would we still think its a universe controlled by gravity or would we suspect that with 99.9% of the universe made of plasma that it is an Electric Universe?

Would humans see a connection between everything? Would we see if there is a Gaia theory or Gaia fact? That the whole solar system and universe is a living electromagnetic lifeform?

Would you see a god or your god or no god? Would you see nothing but random chance or something whatever it is behind it all?













electrobleme

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Elements with their visible light emission spectra
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2014, 01:44:43 »
Elements with their visible light emission spectra

If we had detailed enough eyes, powerful enough eyes, or the ability to process the visible light spectrum from everything around us then we could see the elements with their visible light emission spectra.

What would the geology of the Earth look like?

What would a human body look like?

What would another planet look like?


electrobleme

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Electron and photon light
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2014, 01:53:18 »
Electron and photon light

If people could see all the electromagnetic energy/waves/spectrum and had powerful enough eyes we could then see individual electrons/photons light changing and being emitted.

We could see how light energy changes everything it touches.



Quote

A hydrogen atom has 1 electron. That electron is whipping around its 1 proton nucleus in its ground state orbital. Suddenly, a burst of high energy light hits the hydrogen. This energy is transferred throughout the hydrogen atom, and the electron reacts. The electron will instantaneously “vanish” from the n1 orbital and then reappear on a higher quantum orbital (say n4). This means that as that light wave passed over this hydrogen atom, a specific wavelength was absorbed by the hydrogen.

Eventually, the “excited” electron will drop from its higher quantum orbital (n4) back down to the n1 orbital. When this happens, a specific wavelength of light is emitted by the hydrogen atom. When the electron “drops”, it emits a photon of specific energy or wavelength (dependent upon many factors, including the state the electron was in prior to its “excitement”, the amount of levels the electron dropped, etc.) We can then measure this energy (or wavelength, or frequency,) to determine what element the photon is coming from (in this case, hydrogen). It is in this feature that each element has its own light signature. Each atom can absorb and emit specific wavelengths of light, and they are all tied together by the equations listed above.
Spectroscopy: The Key to Humanity’s Future in Space | universetoday.com