Author Topic: plants transmitting information electromagnetically  (Read 5278 times)

electrobleme

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plants transmitting information electromagnetically
« on: December 22, 2013, 13:55:41 »
plants transmitting information electromagnetically

Recent research has shown that most of those plants in the small but growing study communicate using chemicals but also we are now starting to find electromagnetic communication systems.



All this is a puzzle in a closed system like a gravity theory universe but if it is an electric universe then not only would we hope for everything to be connected we would expect everything to be have circuits.

An electromagnetic universe would also help to explain Gaia, where everything in the world is communicating and part of each other.

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discovered an almost entirely unrecognized way that plants transmit information — with electrical pulses and a system of voltage-based signaling that is eerily reminiscent of the animal nervous system
How Plants Secretly Talk to Each Other | wired.com



Although some argue that it is not the plants actually communicating with each other that they are under attack from pests but the other plants snooping, much like the NSA and all governments, on the communication of the other plants.

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Why should one plant waste energy clueing in its competitors about a danger? They argue that plant communication is a misnomer; it really might just be plant eavesdropping.

Rather than using the vascular system to send messages across meters-long distances, maybe plants release volatile chemicals as a faster, smarter way to communicate with themselves — Heil calls it a soliloquy. Other plants can then monitor these puffs of airborne data.

Bolstering this theory, most of these chemical signals seem to travel no more than 50 to 100 centimeters, at which range a plant would mostly be signaling itself.
How Plants Secretly Talk to Each Other | wired.com