Author Topic: Electric Universe Theory proof? Bipolar planetary nebulae aligned!  (Read 15037 times)

electrobleme

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Electric Universe proof? Bipolar planetary nebulae aligned!

Astronomers have discovered that  Bipolar planetary nebulae in the central bulge of the Milky Way are aligned!

What is even more puzzling for planetary formation theory is that the butterfly nebulae are rotating perpendicular (90 degrees) to the way they gas clouds around them are spinning.

This is unexplainable and not predicted in the theory of gravity Universe.



The findings come from the research paper Alignment of the Angular Momentum Vectors of Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Bulge and is another of the many, many surprises to Gravity Universe scientists.

According to science based on the theory of gravity the bipolar planetary nebulae should have been formed without any interaction or effect on each other, so how they align is a total mystery.

Quote
While any alignment at all is a surprise, to have it in the crowded central region of the galaxy is even more unexpected.
Bizarre Alignment of Planetary Nebulae | eso.org

The Electric Universe Theory - based on Plasma Cosmology where the 4th state of matter is plasma and makes up over 99% of the matter in the universe and billions of times stronger than gravity - may be the only current theory that can start to explain the alignment of planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

The short Electric Universe Theory video below from thunderbolts.info explain the mystery and puzzle for standard science while coming up with diagrams and explanations of how this does fit into a plasma cosmology universe.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/M9LPD6yqizc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/M9LPD6yqizc</a>

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In the Electric Universe, stars form in Bennett pinches in galactic Birkeland currents. Where the concentric tubes of filaments in a Birkeland current develop an instability, the tubes pinch down into an hourglass shape. A plasmoid—a cell of plasma bounded by double layers, perhaps similar to ball lightning—forms in the pinch.
Butterflies on a String | thunderbolts.info


« Last Edit: December 22, 2013, 18:25:47 by electrobleme »