Author Topic: Gale Crater geology, Mars  (Read 39104 times)

electrobleme

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Gale Crater geology, Mars
« on: August 05, 2012, 18:00:15 »
Gale Crater geology, Mars

What will the Gale Crater geology on Mars be like and what will be discovered by NASA's Curiosity Rover?

The scientists and geologists have planned and speculated on the geology conditions and the formation of Gale Crater and its rock strata's based on what they know of the Earths geology.

The problem with this is that what they know about the earths geology and rock layers does not help them predict much if anything successfully on earth. The one constant thing about the earths geology is that we are constantly surprised and nothing predicted seems to be found. We have only bored deep into the earths surface a few times and the findings have been astonishing and the geologists predictions totally wrong ([iurlhttp://www.everythingselectric.com/forum/index.php?topic=165.0]Russian Kola Superdeep Borehole[/iurl] and  KTB superdeep borehole)

The one thing going for the  Curiosity Rover investigation of the geology of Gale Crater is that at least they have mineral surface readings and will only be drilling into surface and boulder rocks.

The main issues are how was Gale Crater formed? Was it by a asteroid hit or was it by an EDM event in an Electric Universe? Are the geology features the result of erosion and water movements or the electrical machining and transmutation of material where it by massive electrical discharges?

The scientists and geologists will be amazed and surprised by what they find in the Gale Crater geology.

How often and for how long can your ideas not predict what you find before you have to start questioning the basic theories and ideas the whole of geology and gravity science is based on?


electrobleme

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Gale Crater geology - crater and mountain formation
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2012, 18:22:26 »
Gale Crater geology - crater and mountain formation

Gale Crater is suggested to be created by an impact billions of years ago and its inner mountain is thought to have been formed over millions of years by water deposits and erosion - creating layers to build the mountain. But was it?

If Gale Crater was formed by a meteor impact and then the central mountain created by mineral deposit layers how can the central peak be higher than the rim of the crater?



A lot of "impact craters" on planets and space bodies have central mountains and spires that were supposed to have been the result of the impact yet Gale Craters central mound and spire (Mount Sharp) is the result of water deposits? If it walks, quacks and looks like a duck ...



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The Curiosity Rover ... for a minimum two-year exploration of a deep hole on Mars' equator known as Gale Crater. The depression was punched out by an asteroid or comet billions of years ago.

The lure for Grotzinger and his fellow scientists is the huge mound of rock rising 5km from the crater floor. Mount Sharp, as they refer to it, looks from satellite pictures to be constructed from ancient sediments - some deposited when Mars still had abundant water at its surface
Gale Crater: Geological 'sweet shop' awaits Mars rover | bbc.co.uk

Unless they are saying that Gale Crater was formed in what geologists suggested is the normal way and that Mount Sharp is its rebound spire and then layers at the bottom and around it were water deposits?

If not how was Mount Sharp and its spire formed? Why would impact craters create these spires and mountains on all types of different asteroids, moons and planets with all different types of minerals, impacts and force of gravity?
« Last Edit: August 06, 2012, 16:13:56 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Gale Crater - rock strata layers (stratigraphy)
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2012, 18:31:19 »

Gale Crater - rock strata layers (stratigraphy)

The Gale Crater and Mount Sharp rock strata results from satellite information are being interpreted as if they were formed by water deposits over millions of years and according to our knowledge of Earths geology.

If Gale Crater and Mount Sharp stratigraphy was not formed by water and a meteor impact they will find some very surprising results.



The Gale Crater Mount Sharp geology seems to show a lot of olivine that is also associated with impact craters. It is also suspected in an Electric Universe to be a tell tale sign of electrical discharges that in an EDM style scenario create craters and other forms of geology.

electrobleme

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Gale Crater - water deposits - Curiosity Rover mission
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2012, 16:12:27 »
Gale Crater - water deposits and alluvial fan -  Curiosity Rover mission





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Mount Sharp, as they refer to it, looks from satellite pictures to be constructed from ancient sediments - some deposited when Mars still had abundant water at its surface.

The intention on Monday is to put MSL-Curiosity down on the flat plain of the crater bottom.

The vehicle will then drive up to the base of Mount Sharp.

In front of it, the rover should find clay minerals (phyllosilicates) that will give a fresh insight into the wet, early era of the Red Planet known as the Noachian. Clays only form when rock spends a lot of time in contact with water.

Above the clays, a little further up the mountain, the rover should find sulphate salts, which relate to the Hesperian Era - a time when Mars was still wet but beginning to dry out.

"Going to Gale will give us the opportunity to study a key transition in the climate of Mars - from the Noachian to the Hesperian," said Sanjeev Gupta, an Imperial College London scientist on the mission.

"The rocks we believe preserve that with real fidelity, and the volume of data we get from Curiosity will be just extraordinary."
Gale Crater: Geological 'sweet shop' awaits Mars rover | bbc.co.uk

electrobleme

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Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons) formation - Gale Crater geology, Mars
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 16:53:51 »
Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons) formation - Gale Crater geology, Mars

The formation of Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons) - the central mountain of Gale Crater Mars - is suggested to have been made by deposits. Mount Sharp is a central mountain in a supposed impact crater. Yet other craters with central peaks, spires or mountains are said to have been formed through rebound from the impacts.



Why is Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons) formation different? Is it due to its size or its mineral characteristics? Or is it simply the belief that Mars had lots of water before and these created all the geological formations on Mars?



If the results of the Curiosity Rover mission do not match the expected results due to water erosion, deposits and formation what will then be the explanation? At any time now or in the future would the basic theories ever be questioned or will geology just be modified and we carry on using the theories that may have not predicted it correctly?


Tycho Crater - central mountains formation

This article describes crater and the formation of central peaks, spires and mountains and has diagrams showing how they were formed - Crater Forms






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The peak is thought to be material that has rebounded back up after being compressed in the impact, and though it's a peak now, it originated at greater depth than any other portion of the crater. The floor of the crater is covered in impact melt, rocks that were heated to such high temperatures during the impact event that they turned to liquid, and flowed across the floor. In the image below, impact melt flowed downhill and pooled, where it cooled.
The Floor of Tycho Crater | nasa.gov




« Last Edit: August 06, 2012, 17:00:10 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Coronation Rock (N165) - no surprise or will it be surprising?
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 20:56:46 »
Coronation Rock (N165) - no surprise or will it be surprising?

Curiosity Rover will be zapping the Coronation Rock (N165) in Gale Crater using its special geology lazer and ChemCam. They expect to find nothing surprising about the geology/chemistry of the rock. Will that be the case?

The formation of the rocks, minerals and layers in Gale Crater is suggested to be due to a crater being filled then partially unfilled by sediment and water erosion. Which in itself is strange as Gale Crater has the typical meteor crater spire that is formed for whatever reason but this time it is nothing to do with a impact.

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"I'd probably guess this is a typical Mars basalt - basaltic rocks making up a large fraction of all the igneous rocks on Mars," Roger Wiens, the instrument's principal investigator, told BBC News.

"A basalt, which is also common under the ocean on Earth, typically has 48% silicon dioxide and percent amounts of iron, calcium and magnesium, and sodium and potassium oxides as well. We're not expecting any surprises," said the Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher.
Nasa's Curiosity rover prepares to zap Martian rocks | bbc.co.uk

Will Mars basalt rock be the same mixture as Earths? Or will it be different as it may have been formed in a different manner?

The Electric Universe theory and related ideas on the formation of planets and rocks are very different to geologists and scientists. The rock itself is the same but how it was formed is not. The EU Theory would suggest most craters are formed through electro magnetic discharges and electro magnetic forces give the necessary energy, heat and crushing power to metamorphosize rock.

If the Coronation Rock N165 is exactly or very nearly the same as earths then that in itself is interesting as both planets would have been formed under very different circumstances, conditions and local minerals.

If the same then how could that be? Unless the same same process not dependent on the local conditions creates the same outcome?

If different to each other then its a matter of interpretation as to what that means. And if it is very different ...



Coronation Rock (N165) has been zapped and the scientists are looking at the results, nothing has been released yet.

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The inaugural target of the laser was a 7cm-wide rock dubbed "Coronation" (previously N165).

It had no particular science value, and was expected to be just another lump of ubiquitous Martian basalt, a volcanic rock.

Its appeal was the nice smooth face it offered to the laser.

"We got a great spectrum of Coronation - lots of signal," said ChemCam principal investigator Roger Wiens of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico.

"Our team is both thrilled and working hard, looking at the results. After eight years building the instrument, it's pay-off time."

One aspect being considered by the team is whether the signal changed slightly as the laser burrowed through any exterior layers that might have coated Coronation.

"Coatings can tell you about, say, the weather or what has happened to a rock through the eons," Dr Wiens told the BBC last week.

"We will look at the first few laser shots and see if there is any difference as we move further into the rock."
Nasa's Curiosity rover zaps Mars rock called Coronation | bbc.co.uk
« Last Edit: August 20, 2012, 21:00:57 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Glenelg, Gale Crater, Mars geology - Curiosity Rover
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2012, 03:15:13 »
The Glenelg area in Gale Crater, Mars, will soon be explored by the Curiosity Rover. it is close to where the Curiosity Rover (otherwise known as the Mars Science Laboratory, MSL) has landed and appears to be at the intersection of 3 different types of Mars terrain.

So it should be a good place to see what the geology of Gale Crater is like and how it fits into standard geology theories or gEUlogy theories.