Author Topic: The Puddingstone Trail - Norfolk  (Read 12988 times)

electrobleme

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The Puddingstone Trail - Norfolk
« on: February 23, 2012, 07:04:37 »
The Puddingstone Trail - Norfolk

The Puddingstone Trail is a suggested ancient stone marker trackway that leads from Seahenge to Grimes Graves in Norfolk and then on to Stonehenge.

I had never heard of it before today and it is one of those things that is likely to be true, as the ancients would have used stone markers to guide them along the ancient Green Lanes of tracks of Briton, but is there a very precise route that is the The Puddingstone Trail or is it part of a much larger system of ancient trails?


Puddingstone Trail route from Norfolk (Seahenge to Grimes Graves) to Avebury and Stonehenge


With my interest in Norfolk "Glacial Eratics" like the Merton Stone, which just happens to be along the "Peddars Way" (a suggested part of the Puddingstone Trail in Norfolk) it is an interesting idea.


The Puddingstone Trail Norfolk
« Last Edit: February 23, 2012, 07:19:51 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Puddingstone Trail - Norfolks Seahenge to Stonehenge - index and links
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2012, 07:13:34 »

Puddingstone Trail - Norfolks Seahenge to Stonehenge - index and links

Here are some links if you want to investigate further and I may do some more research at a later time.

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=2146412012
http://www.hiddenea.com/stoneindex.htm
http://www.essex.ac.uk/history/esah/Newsletters/ESAH_Spring2006.pdf
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,816624,00.html
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/asb_mapsquare.php?op=map&sq=TL&sitetype=36

"The Lost Trackway - from Grime's Graves to Stonehenge" by Ernest A. Rudge, Ph.D. edited and prepared for publication by John Cooper in 1994

electrobleme

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The Puddingstone Trail - fact or fantasy? (megalithic.co.uk)
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2012, 07:16:26 »

The Puddingstone Trail - fact or fantasy? (megalithic.co.uk)




Quote

The Puddingstone Trail - fact or fantasy?

Is there a lost Neolithic trade route that took high quality flint from the mines at Grimes Graves to Stonehenge? Dr Ernest Rudge certainly thought so and spent many years researching what he called a "Lost Highway". Rudge located many puddingstone boulders that he thought acted as marker stones along the way.

After his death in 1984, his work was summarised by John Cooper of the Department of Palaeontology at London's Natural History Museum.

Do the stones mark an ancient trade route? Is there evidence of Pagan worship?

Long distance trade routes certainly existed long before the coming of the Romans and the Icknield Way is an undisputed track from 'Seahenge' to Stonehenge via Grimes Graves- its name changes en route from Peddars Way to Icknield Way to Ridgeway. So why was there a need for another trackway?

Perhaps the answer lies in the route chosen in as much as it is not as direct as the Icknield Way - it makes a dog-leg into Essex and comes close to Colchester at Stanway (meaning the stone way). The route then goes on to St Albans before heading directly towards Wiltshire. The suggestion is that the track served communities in what is now Suffolk, Essex and Hertfordshire.

What is Puddingstone?

Puddingstone is so named because it looks like a plum pudding stuffed with fruit. Rounded flint pebbles in river beds were covered in sediment that was turned into quartzite under immense pressure. Then glaciers tore up the river beds and sections became conglomerate boulders that were embedded in the ice and moved south as the glaciers advanced. When the glaciers melted, the boulders were left behind in debris of mud, gravel and clay.

Apart from clay and gravel, East Anglia has no stone other than chalk with flint nodules, so large erratic boulders would probably have had special significance to early inhabitants of the region.
The Puddingstone Trail - fact or fantasy? | megalithic.co.uk