Author Topic: Stonehenge - inspired or built for sound (frequencies) ?  (Read 11397 times)

electrobleme

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Stonehenge - inspired or built for sound (frequencies) ?
« on: February 21, 2012, 20:35:48 »
Stonehenge - inspired or built for sound (frequencies) ?

A recent article on the BBC has given details about how Stonehenge was possibly inspired or built for sound/frequencies.


Stonehenge and archaeoacoustics - built for or designed by sound?

This is not a new idea as such but Steven Waller suggests he has sort of evidence to back it up with regards to Stonehenge in experiments using sound and people.

The "Temples" of Malta are perhaps not temples of worship as we have decided they are because what else could they be? Sounds and frequencies seem to be behind their design and construction, so this would fit in with Steven Waller and his Stonehenge archaeoacoustics ideas.

Using patterns of constructive and destructive interference to have spots of high or no energy. All you need to do is control the sound, the shape or pattern of the temples or rooms and where you place the bowl or shelves (alters) where you want to put the seeds, eggs or pregnant animals to germinate or enpower them. You could also do it as healing centres for for humans. Malta's Health Temples? Stonehenge Health and Life Centre?

Not only could the Malta Temples be acoustic energy centres but the famous underground temples of Malta including the Hypogeum are constructed for sound.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2012, 20:55:27 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Stonehenge design was 'inspired by sounds'
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2012, 20:49:13 »


Quote

Music could have been an inspiration for the design of Stonehenge, according to an American researcher.

Steven Waller's intriguing idea is that ancient Britons could have based the layout of the great monument, in part, on the way they perceived sound.

He has been able to show how two flutes played in a field can produce an auditory illusion that mimics in space the position of the henge's pillars.

Mr Waller presented the idea at the AAAS meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

He told the BBC: "My theory is that the ancient Britons, when they were hearing two pipers in a field, were experiencing sound wave interference patterns, where in certain locations as you walked around the pair of pipers, you would hear loud or quiet zones.

"If you could look at it from an overhead view, it would look like the spokes of a wheel. And, as you walk around the circle, every time you come to one of these sound-wave cancellation points, it feels like there is this massive invisible object in front of you.

"Put all this 'vision in your mind' together and it forms a Stonehenge-like structure."

Mr Waller is an expert in "archaeoacoustics", which examines the role sound might have played in ancient cultures.

It is just one of a host of different topics being discussed here at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Supernatural explanations

The La Mesa, California-based researcher said he had demonstrated the auditory henge effect using blindfolded subjects.

He took these people into a field where two pipers were playing and afterwards asked them to draw diagrams of the soundscape they had experienced.

"These people were not told anything about interference patterns or Stonehenge; they were completely naive subjects," he recalled.

"And it was very interesting when they took the blindfolds off, and after having described the presence of large structures to then discover nothing was there in the field except these two flutes - they were flabbergasted."

Mr Waller said his ideas had been further strengthened by measurements he had made of the acoustic shadows actually cast by the Stonehenge megaliths. He found they accurately reproduced the interference pattern that would be generated by two flutes playing in the centre of the monument.

Mr Waller argued that the sounds' behaviour would have utterly captivated the ancients.

"People didn't even know that sound was propagated by pressure waves until a few centuries ago," he said.

"We know that sound was a great mystery to the ancients because there are many myths about echoes being a spirit that lives in the rock and which calls back, or that thunder was caused by large birds in the sky flapping their wings. They had supernatural explanations for all these sound phenomena."
Stonehenge design was 'inspired by sounds' | bbc.co.uk

electrobleme

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Quote
Virtual Acoustic Images and Sound-Attenuators as Objects of Ancient Veneration

Steven J. Waller , Independent Scholar, La Mesa, CA

Sound phenomena perplexed pre-scientific cultures lacking wave theory. Echo myths suggest virtual acoustic images were perceived as supernatural non-corporeal agents. Similarly, destructive interference can be modeled as virtual sound-attenuators casting acoustic shadows.

Prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs, megalithic monuments, and related myths of echo spirits and magic pipers are analyzed as evidence for ancient veneration rites tied to particular archaeological soundscapes. Just as virtual images appear within a mirror due to light reflection, virtual sound sources can seem to originate deep within a cliff due to sound reflection.

Modern ray tracing modeling takes advantage of the fact that sound reflections from a surface are mathematically identical to sound waves emanating from virtual acoustic sources behind the reflecting plane. Myths around the world attest to beliefs that echoes were spirit voices calling out from rocks. Acoustic measurements support the hypothesis that ancient rock art locations were deliberately chosen for their sound reflection characteristics, and decorated with images that relate to the echo spirits believed to dwell there.

In a similar way, sound attenuation caused by destructive wave cancellation from two sound sources can be misperceived as acoustic shadows. Interference patterns can be modeled by virtual sound-blocking objects perturbing the ambient sound. To people unaware of wave cancellation and reinforcement, the pattern of dead zones alternating with loud zones would have been completely mysterious, hence magical.

Experiments with two flutes demonstrate that blindfolded participants can misinterpret the interference patterns as acoustic shadows cast by a ring of "pillars" similar to Stonehenge. This auditory illusion of unseen massive objects can be categorized as delusional perception, in which correctly sensed physical phenomena were given some additional interpretational significance. Myths of walls of air forming invisible towers, and two magic pipers who caused the formation of stone rings, provide additional clues.

Measurements of the actual acoustic shadows radiating outward from Stonehenge are quantitatively and geometrically similar to a two point sound wave interference pattern.  These data support the new theory that sound wave interference patterns were attributed to massive invisible objects, and that this “vision” of a ring of magic stones served as a blueprint for Stonehenge.
Virtual Acoustic Images and Sound-Attenuators as Objects of Ancient Veneration  | aaas.confex.com