Author Topic: Woden/Odin - leader of the Wild Hunt and the Raging Host  (Read 15935 times)

electrobleme

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Woden/Odin - leader of the Wild Hunt and the Raging Host



Odin/Woden Wild Hunt


Wodin is the Anglo Saxon name for the Norse god Odin and Wodin/Odin were said to be the leader of the Wild Hunt, Raging Host, Asgardreia etc. The Wild Hunt were a group of figures riding through the sky, hunting or following a figure.



Woden/Odin Wild Hunt


The Raging Host was also a name for that group in the sky or the Wild Hunt as storms, lightning, thunder and other effects were associated with them. Also the usually effects associated with comets, wars, doom, pestilence came after the Wild Hun, their passage through the skies.


Woden/Odin and the Raging Host / Wild Hunt


Was the Wild Hunt or Raging Host inspired by actual events in the sky? Is the legend of the Woden/Odin Hunt really describing planetary chaos and catastrophes witnessed by ancient people and recorded in many civilisations legends? Similar to the planet Venus as a comet, Mars and other planet gods fighting wars in the skies and hurling their thunderbolts at each other? tales like these are found in our myths and legends, also similar to the ideas that gary gilligan puts forward in his book Comet Venus. That the ancient tales were real events seen in the skies.

in garys book Comet Venus he suggests that the pharaohs seen in images and writing on the temple walls lead and are found at the head of the army as it charges straight into the enemy are actually the planet/object that the pharoah has been associated with. Charging across the sky into the dust/debris that was in our solar system during a time during and after a catastrophe had occured in our solar system. a similar event or that event could have inspired the northern countries myths and legends versions of the same thing.

Were they Hunting or following the mythical figure in the front, were they smaller space objects following after the main object?

are there other things that could have caused or inspired it, are there other similar legends from around the world?

was it not a long term thing, could it have been short term things, some Electric Universe event that appeared in our heavens for a short time?





Raging Host and Norse/British myths and legends


Why do we not see the Wild Hunt anymore, why has the legend gone into obscurity? Now our world and our solar system is a much calmer place than compared to before.

But when will the Wild Hunt and its Raging Host ride through our skies again?




« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 18:00:01 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Woden/Odin and the Raging Host - myths and legends quotes and sites
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2010, 23:46:07 »

Woden/Odin and the Raging Host - myths and legends quotes and sites

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In Orkney, indeed, across most of northern Europe, belief in the Wild Hunt was once widespread. In the islands, little remains of the belief today.

The form of the Wild Hunt, or Raging Host, varied across each of the geographical locations/ in which the tradition was found. But the basic idea was generally the same - a phantasmal leader, accompanied by a horde of hounds and men, hurtled through the night sky, their passing marked by a tumultuous racket of pounding hooves, howling dogs and raging winds.

The quarry of this spectral horde also varies. Norse legend, for example, suggests objects such as a boar, a wild horse and even magical maidens.

Later Christian influences had the Wild Hunt summoning the souls of evildoers, sinners and unbaptised infants.

But one theme was common to all - to see the Wild Hunt was a very bad omen, usually foretelling a time of strife or death.


Odin's chase and the souls of the dead

At the root of the myth lies the Teutonic god Woden, or Odin, to use his Norse name.

Odin, in his guise of wind-god, was thought to rushing through the skies astride his eight-legged steed, Sleipnir.

As it was thought that the souls of the dead were wafted away on the winds of a storm, Odin became regarded as the leader of all disembodied spirits - the gatherer of the dead. Eventually, storms became associated with his passing.

In this role he was known as the Wild Huntsman. The passage of his hunt, known as Odin's Hunt, the Wild Ride, the Raging Host or Asgardreia, was said to presage misfortune such as pestilence, death or war.

Odin, followed by the ghosts of the dead, would roam the skies, accompanied by furious winds, lightning and thunder. To the believers, the tumult must surely have been evidence of the god's passing.
The Wild Hunt | orkneyjar.com



Quote
Evidence for Wodens character as a kind of shaman is contained in the charm known as the Nine Herbs Charm, where part of it says:

'These nine have power against nine poisons,
A worm came crawling, it bit a man,
Then Woden took nine glory twigs,
Smote the adder so that it split into nine,
There ended apple and poison.'

People tend to agree that the glory twigs are bits of wood or twigs inscribed with the runic character corresponding to the initial letter of each of the nine herbs mentioned earlier in the charm. With the use of rune magic, the healing properties of each of the nine herbs is transferred to each of the nine twigs, which then become glory twigs, and are then cast by Woden to attack the illness, which is visualised as a crawling serpent or worm, to cure the afflicted person of whatever he or she is suffering from.
One of the most enduring aspects of Woden is his leading of the Wild Hunt, a ride through the sky with his army of noisy lost souls. The Wild Hunt takes different forms depending on which country and which period in time it was recorded. The best example of the Wild Hunt in Anglo-Saxon tradition is the much quoted passage in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for the year 1127 c.e, it reads:

'Let no one be surprised at what we are going to relate, for it was common gossip up and down the countryside that after February 6th many people both saw and heard a whole pack of huntsmen in full cry. They straddled black horses and black bucks, while their hounds were pitch black with staring hideous eyes. This was seen in the very deer park of Peterborough town, and in all the woods stretching from that same spot as far as Stamford. All through the night monks heard them sounding and winding their horns. Reliable witnesses who kept watch in the night declared that there might well have been twenty or even thirty of them in this tantivy as near as they could tell.'
Woden | englishheathenism.homestead.com


Quote
In the Scandinavian countries of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark the Hunt was most often named after its leader, Odin. It was called Odensjakt (Odin's Hunt), Oskerei (Horrific or Thunderous Ride), the Gandreid (Ride of the Dead), and the Asgardreia (Ride of Asgard). This Norse version of the Hunt was often seen chasing a beautiful Otherworldly maiden — perhaps a memory of grim night chases conducted by invading armies for purposes of stealing wives from their enemies. Such imagery also seems to refer to struggles for supremacy between rising patriarchal gods (embodied in the Hunt and its antlered warrior leader) and ancient European goddess cults.

Leaders of the Pack

In Germany where many tales of the Hunt have survived and are still being re-enacted today, the Hunt is still commonly associated with Odin and called Wotan's Hunt. Other names were Wotan's Army, the Wilde Jagd. The Wild Hunt in Germany was also known to be led by several female deities. Perchta, Holda, and the White Lady known as Frau Gauden all led processions of unbaptized children and witches through the night sky. The fields they rode past would produce double the usual harvest the next year. Such deities all tended to rule over fertility and domestic spheres: planting, spinning, weaving, and childbearing. These European Hunt goddesses (increasingly associated with agricultural and domestic fertility in the middle ages) seem to share associations with Diana/Artemis of classical tradition, who was herself a hunter, dealing out punishment for insults and violations of hunting-related taboos. As the horned moon-goddess, she may have lent another important association to the Hunt leader in the form of antlers, an ancient symbol which serves to blur the boundary between hunter and hunted.
On the Trail of the Wild Hunt | theapricity.com