Author Topic: universal waffle  (Read 24283 times)

electrobleme

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churches and are the place to Bee - Rosslyn Chapel
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2010, 17:02:31 »
During the recent renovations at rosslyn Chapel they have discovered intentional hollow pinnacles with a hole from the centre of a rose carving left so bees could nest in them.
The pinnacle point will be geometrically exactly where the bees want to be, and the masons and templars will have known this, and thus left provision for the bees, and for those who can see the clues to see them, but not just with Your eyes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCyJRXvPNRo
Kevin



Rosslyn Chapel bees hive in the north pinnacle


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Honeycombs were found abandoned inside the hive in the north pinnacle, but, equally strangely, the hive on the south pinnacle did not have an entry hole for bees and therefore had not been occupied.

Mr Mitchell said: “It’s just another of Rosslyn’s mysteries. The north pinnacle was full of honeycombs which had been abandoned for some considerable years. The honey had all dried up.”

The experts believe the interior of the hives were lined with a coating to prevent the wild bees from gnawing away at the stonework...

There is anecdotal evidence that visitors to the chapel, which dates back to 1446, used to be disturbed by bees. Mr Mitchell said some of the staff at the Rosslyn Trust were aware some years ago that there had been bees going into the cavity. The hives have now been reinstated within the rebuilt pinnacles on the roof of the chapel.
Rosslyn Chapel discovery is causing a buzz | timesonline.co.uk



the bee hive honeycomb found at Rosslyn Chapel in scotland


Sacred Bees and Rosslyn Chapel | The British Society of Dowsers mentions the ley lines etc. this forum post has a number of very interesting links to other posts and sites.


there is also this video, not exactly very good camera work but it does show the pinnacles on the roof of Rosslyn Chapel


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The predecessor of the present church had medieval and earlier 17thC features, and a curious 'bee-hive' bell-turret, though Theophilus Jones at the beginning of the 19thC claimed that the church had been rebuilt in 1690. In a detailed discussion Williams described the building as consisting of a nave, north aisle and chancel, and a south porch that had a pointed arch to the doorway of uncertain date. The bell-turret had circular openings and a peculiar string course, and was considered to be 18thC.
Church of St Bridget , Llansantffraed juxta Usk | Brecknockshire Churches Survey

electrobleme

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Bee King - egyptian pharaohs
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2010, 17:25:17 »

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Bee-keeping

When the Sun weeps a second time, and lets fall water from his eyes, it is changed into working bees; they work in the flowers of each kind, and honey and wax are produced instead of water.
pSalt 825, first millennium BCE


The first official mention recognizing the importance of honey dates from the first dynasty, when the title of "Sealer of the Honey" is given; the oldest pictures of bee-keepers in action are from the Old Kingdom: in Niuserre's sun temple bee-keepers are shown blowing smoke into hives as they are removing the honey-combs. After extracting the honey from the combs it was strained and poured into earthen jars which were then sealed. Honey treated in this manner could be kept years. From the New Kingdom on mentions of honey become more frequent, but only four depictions of honey production and no actual hives have been found.

The main centre of bee-keeping was Lower Egypt with its extensive irrigated lands full of flowering plants, where the bee was chosen as a symbol for the country. Since earliest times one of the pharaohs' titles was Bee King,  and the gods also were associated with the bee. The sanctuary in which Osiris was worshipped, was the Hwt bjt, the Mansion of the Bee.

The Egyptians had a steady honey supply from their domesticated bees, but they seem to have valued wild honey even more. Honey hunters, often protected by royal archers, would scour the wild wadis for bee colonies.

I appointed for thee archers and collectors of honey, bearing incense to deliver their yearly impost into thy august treasury.
Papyrus Harris, donation to the temple of Re at Heliopolis, New Kingdom [28]
Bee-keeping | reshafim.org


The island of Malta is known as the land of Honey, Melita. Although that may not have been its origins. Its honey is famous so it may just be the reason but with all the history and "temples" there could be another reason. I was told there were a number of islands in the Mediterranean called Melita or honey.

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Malta

The Maltese honey, from the superior quality of which the island was supposed to derive its name of Melita  (i.e. Greek meli, gen. melitos = honey)

It is even probable that the Phoenicians gave the island its name, which seems to be derived from the verb "malat", "to take refuge" and to mean, therefore, "the place of refuge".
Malta | newadvent.org


the maltese bee keeper i spoke to explained to me about why honey bees go drowsy when you smoke em. its not that the smoke makes them drowsy they assume that there is a wildfire, the workers eat and digest all the honey in the hive to keep it safe and transport it to the new hive of safety. the large amounts of honey they have in them makes them drowsy!

he also said that bee hives where the honeycombs are being produced are amazingly clean, not a speck of debris can be found

kevin

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Re: universal waffle
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2010, 00:55:54 »
Electrobleme,
                       I watch bees very closely, and I check where they build their hives.
There were two last year in the walls of the chuch 100 yards from Me now.
I also watch them when they swarm and where they land.
They are brilliant but brilliant dowsers, that which I follow, they follow.
But they are far more advanced than Myself.
With all the digital signals now been unleashed about this planet I feel they are under stress to make sense of what has suddenly arrived, they are lost.
We have opened pandoras box without any notion of the consequences.
Kevin

electrobleme

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Re: universal waffle
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2010, 05:27:43 »
Electrobleme,
                       I watch bees very closely, and I check where they build their hives.
There were two last year in the walls of the chuch 100 yards from Me now.
I also watch them when they swarm and where they land.
They are brilliant but brilliant dowsers, that which I follow, they follow.
But they are far more advanced than Myself.
With all the digital signals now been unleashed about this planet I feel they are under stress to make sense of what has suddenly arrived, they are lost.
We have opened pandoras box without any notion of the consequences.
Kevin

the massive increase in electromagnetic waves must have hurt everything, increases in human disease like cancer perhaps, people using computer monitors and tv screens, pigeons getting lost, whales mass beaching themselves

and of course the fact that the police in the uk have set up their system of powerful communication towers at the frequency of the brain (or so we are told)

the death of bees and wasps would help the gm companies and then a world govt thats for sure ...

all accidental or all deliberate?

kevin, are you saying that people would have used bees to find ley lines and energy places, thats why they encouraged them to live near them (apart from the honey of course)?

electrobleme

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electric bees
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2010, 02:28:47 »

found this while reading the book the great english earthquake by peter haining

*p140 - readers letter to the essex weekly news on april 23rd
"the following curious fact may perhaps be of interest to some of your agricultural readers:- i was attending to my hives on tuesday morning at about a quarter past nine, when the bees, which had hitherto been busily working, suddenly ceased, and whithout apparent reason became torpid. in fact it seemed as though the inhabitants of each hive and been stricken with paralysis.
as i was endeavouring to ascertain the cause of this eccentric behaviour, the earthquake passed, and caused the hive to oscillate very perceptibly for several seconds. after the shock had ceased, the bees slowly recovered consiousness and resumed work.
this is by no means the first instance on record of this extraordinary foreknowledge on the part of bees and kindred insects, for in countries where earthquakes are of frequent occurrence the same thing has often been noticed."

electrobleme

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warning sound - bee on your guard
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2010, 20:32:43 »
do bees/wasps make a noise to warn off predators? perhaps not even the noise itself is the warning but the frequency of the energy given off may warn those much further away than sound or those that cant hear the sound. after all animals are very electric.

why would they waste energy making a noise?

do planets and trees leaves rustle for a variation of this purpose? to attract the appropriate plants and animals they need?

are the leaves designed to make a certain noise at a certain frequency?

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bees colour and stripes including xanthopus and canairensis


Bumblebees' distinctive bright yellow and black stripes may not be what keeps them safe from their enemies, scientists say.

A UK study has shown that other aspects of bees' behaviour may matter more than the classic bee colour to keep predators away.

This could be the way bumblebees fly or perhaps the buzzing sound they make, say the scientists.

The results of the study were published in the Journal of Zoology.

Scientists have long believed that once flying predators get stung by a bee, they remember their experience and in the future rely strongly on colour cues to identify their prey.

"The first time a bird eats a brightly coloured bumblebee it gets a nasty surprise. Remembering the bee's bright colours may help the bird to avoid making the same mistake again," said Dr Nigel Raine from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London, a researcher on the study.

Birds perceive the world differently to humans, being able to see light in the ultraviolet range of the spectrum. But they can still distinguish between different species of bees, explained the scientist.

So the researchers wanted to check if bees' colours were the only thing that helped to warn off predators.
'Unexpected' results

Dr Raine and his colleagues from the University of London set up a number of colonies from different populations of bumblebees in the UK, Germany and Sardinia.

Though some insects had similar colour patterns - bands of bright yellow, white, orange or red and regions of black, others looked quite different from one another.

"In the UK, they are yellow-and-black-striped with a white tip on the abdomen, but in the Canary Islands for example they don't have any yellow bands at all - they're just black and white," said Dr Raine.

The scientists expected birds to rely on visual clues, meaning they would be more likely to attack bees that looked different from the ones they were used to.

"All our bees were individually numbered with tags on the back of the thorax, so that we could keep track of each individual that left and entered the nest," said the researcher.

The scientists then counted how many bees did not return to their nest and compared the loss rate of different Bombus terrestris populations with different colour patterns in the same environment.

They got some rather unexpected results, said Dr Raine.

"Predators didn't seem to target the unusually coloured bees more than the native populations we tested. Perhaps the bumbling way in which all bumblebees fly or their distinctive deep buzzing are more important clues to help would-be predators avoid a nasty sting," he said.

His colleague Ralph Stelzer, the main author of the study and a PhD student at Queen Mary, University of London, called the findings surprising.

"The results mean that the explanation for the bumblebees' colouration patterns is not as simple as previously thought," he said.

The scientists believe that perhaps birds prefer not to take any chances - and to steer clear of all insects that look, sound or fly like a bumblebee to avoid being stung.
Bee stripes may not keep predators away
« Last Edit: June 02, 2010, 20:35:08 by electrobleme »