Author Topic: ever had a "brainwave", a bolt from the blue? the concept of "Akashic Records"  (Read 113036 times)

Mo

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Mo - the idea that our past trauma might stop us connecting fully to the "Akashic Records Concept" - is this something human stopping us or is it the EU stopping us from accessing it fully?
electrobleme


There is a resonance now with the past that makes our whole body express genes the same as they were in the past trauma.  Panic attacks are like that.  Some situations resonate strongly with a past trauma.  But it is the effect on the body below consciousness that is insidious.  A stress is produced that over activates our genes.

But it is the actual trauma of the past that changes our ancestor's genes, and we inherit those genes.  I think that it is these damaged genes that stop us having all sorts of different abilities.  So it becomes a matter of dealing with the past.  And it is here that the EU leads to a breakthrough in understanding the past.

If humans then something like shock trauma we suffer from now, stopping or blocking access to bad memories that may damage us mentally. or we are not ready to confront them.
electrobleme


We may be able to stop bad memories from entering consciousness, but there is still an effect on the body and brain all the time.  Let us leave aside confronting early childhood memories and consider how one can deal with ancient ancestral trauma.  Obviously understanding that trauma is part of the process.

Would we even recognise the past if we saw it ?  How would one describe the ancient sky  even if one had a dream about it.  One might see strange creatures that move, just like the ancient Egyptians.

If a person has this knowledge of the catastrophes and fully accepts it would they be allowed or can full access it?
electrobleme


I would not be so keen on accessing the past trauma.  One definitely needs practice in accessing past trauma.  But if one is thrown into an ancient experience then understanding what is happening can't hurt.

Is access to this data base it like Astral Planing or is that something very different?
electrobleme


We would need to ask Edgar Cayce.

if the Malta "Temples" and other old structures including landscapes such as Tors / meeting of Ley Lines were to harness/transform the natural power of an Electric Universe is this where it was easier or the only physical places where you could be energised to access the records. or did they tune your body into the frequency you needed?
electrobleme


One for kevin. Some places affect kundalini flow. This affects gene expression.

natural chemical substances such as hallucinogenics changing our bodies in the same way, for the shamen and the old cults/priests electrobleme

Take the case of a kundalini flow increasing DMT in the pineal, whilst some herbal hallucinogen does the same.  Kundalini does much more, but the shamanic herbal experience can help clear the past trauma.  Clearing the past trauma increases kundalini.  The herbal hallucinogen obviously can be dangerous with or without an experienced guide.  Modern psychotherapy has made great advances.  But the jump to ancient ancestral experiences is a mighty one.

Mo

electrobleme

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fixed lattice and switching
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2010, 04:15:34 »
The lattice never moving has been My biggest headache.
NOTHING is moving, it's a solid.
The force that travels within the solid provides the ability to switch.
Are the pictures on Your screen moving?
Are the pixel points fixed?
Is your hand moving seperately , or switching across from location to location?

It's all by field, biefeld Brown.

The field is locally contained and empowered from it's surrounding field, this is at all scale.
Space is local, the galaxy is a contained field within another field, add infirnitum.
The scale is as above, so below from wherever You are.
The planet is not moving in an isolated independant fashion, it is switching .
All fields are centre orientated, I am alpha and omega, phase conjugate pumps deliver laser like signal that pass each other in both directions, time is the switching as those signals travel from source back to source, not C, far faster than that.
C is a local switching, light is not travelling but a local field stress, the sun's field stresses the earths or the moons, light occurs relative to the field, C is the switching speed between source and source local and relative to it's field.

Field modulation within a confined field will result in the modulated field switching to wherever that condition exists, super luminally, not a travel or thrust situation, a condition relative senario.
As for local positioning, balance is the KEY, the heart is the centre field pinch point, hence the Egyptian scales showing balance at the heart.
local field balance and increase in both sides of the duality will lead to uplift in the field.
the egyptians were clearly dowsers supreme, I recognise it, and their methods, watch the ankh held down by the leg at one side, watch which hand holds what, watch the hands especially the females.
Our hands and feet( gold plimsoles) are antennae, the field around this planet is layered, it will be layered right from the centre out to the edge of the iononosphere, opposite spin flows of a duality that chases itself from source to source.
Our actual selves are this, We are this, but not in 3D, in a higher dimension, We utilise the vessels called bodies to interact in 3d, but are of higher dimension really, if you uplift Your own field proportions, then You meet YOURSELF, it's bizzare.
Kevin


kevin, i am still trying to get my head round all the ideas in this. could you start of with the bit about the lattice NOT moving. Are the lines fixed in place while the earth for ever or do you think they change if we have a catastrophe or the planets/sun changes orbits?  Do Ley Lines not move or are they more to do with natural electrical currents and not the lattice or is it all related and the same?

Also could you explain a bit further about the switching?

Cheers :)


kevin

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The Lattice,
This gave Me months of sleepless nights, it never moves.

I couldn't reconcile this with all the thoughts that were entering into me.
Everyone talks of Earth and the other planets and stars as seperate independant objects.

The most obvious solution was that the lattice was of earth, but something wouldn't allow that to rest.

The lattice is fixed, and by every available ancient construction I could get to it had obviously been exactly where it is now when they were built.
That which flows upon that lattice varies constantly, and apparently mirrors the apparent movements of the sun and moon in particuler.
The moon gives the biggest clues possible.
I have an advantage, in dowsing, it gives the geometry involved, and I am not alone in kinowing this, but secrecy is interwoven right through time.
The geometry though demonstrates the method of how the flows interact, each local section is a mere mirror image out into universe( as above, so below)
I suddenly began to SEE the system within myself, where everything is in a solid, and is fed by circuits in spiral sequencing fashion.
The solid is super tensile, far more dense than diamond.
Everything created in 3D is merely a local re-orientation of the one solid, and is enabled to remember how it is re-orientated by the constant feed in duality of the opposing magnetic flows.
The spiral vortex fashion of how these flows travel is where the illusions of movement are situated in.
Again the moon is offering a unique clue in its apparent none spinng except in line with its apparent orbitting of the earth, it's the geometry of spherical nature revealing itself due to the proximity of the moon.
from wherever the observer is sited here or on the moon or anywhere in between the illusion will remain relative to the pathways of spiral nature.
It explains the so called serpent cults.
We must see via these spiral flows that travel in both directions to and from whatever is observed

Then the realisations became clear of how mass is created within the geometry, and is fixed within the geometry, but our detection is via a none fixed system that operates on the lattice , the timi9ng of outward and return signalling leading to the illusions of movements.
I began to concentrate on lifeforms and try and resolve how they were apparently moving, I could detect the field about anyone or anything, and realised this gave an independant local arrangement of switching, again it is really difficult to think in terms of yourself been nothing more than zillions of re-organised units that are locally held within a sheath, a field of multi layers, these layers switch across at the will of how the field decides to switch, just as pixels switch across a television screen.

I had to isolate individually each field, as all things have their own field, every atom and whatever is part of atoms.
Space will be where most of the atoms of the solid are mostly aligned, mass will be where locally re-organised collections occur and remember how to remain as such as their collective field maintains this.
C the so called speed of light will be a switching rate locally within the field of this planet


it's switching rate will vary relative to the resistance offered by the locally re-organised units within any field.
Thus then the sun is not the provider in a nuclear fashion, but is a giant resistor to the free flow of the duality permeating all of universe.
The sun will be layered realtive to the geometry of the lattice position it is sited in, and will then respond to the flows variations in all directions at once, but with a marked general flow relative to the suns position in far larger geometry.


Movement will require switching power to be given to every unit within each field, the amount of this switching power will determine the rate available to switch, thus as this drops off with age we become slower and stiffer, until the switching power leaves and we set almost solid, riger mortice sets in.
that will give way to dissolvement back to whatever is locally about the dissolving units, thus we return to the earths local field.
All is ONE, litterally, the whole universe, and it is ONE solid that allows every unit of that solid to re-organise locally and to accumulate into whatever and remain as such as long as the duality of life force enables them to remain locally re-organised.

Nothing is independant at all, the geometry leads to mass formingin the 3d We are physically part of, but our actual selves, the field part is in 4or 5 D utilising the 3d vessels to experience physicality, our 4D selves know the true reality of universe but veil the physical, possibly for very good reasons.
it's a bizzare realisation totally foreign to accepted thinking, but an electrical thinker has more chance, but the true realisation is that the whole ONE is alive, then the veiling makes sense in a self protective fashion to stop local interferance within the whole living entity?
kevin




Mo

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Kevin, doesn't the human body have field lines, just like the Earth.  And these field lines would never move, just like the Earth's field lines.  Yet the human body moves and it is a separate independent object.

Are you saying that everything is in resonance with a primal solid ?  The spiral flows sound like Birkeland currents and one wonders if what you are measuring is electrical or like electricity.  I tend to see Birkeland currents explaining serpent cults.  Perhaps things were more electrical in the past producing more visible Birkeland currents and stronger flow through the fields that you measure.
Mo

kevin

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Kevin, doesn't the human body have field lines, just like the Earth.  And these field lines would never move, just like the Earth's field lines.  Yet the human body moves and it is a separate independent object.

Are you saying that everything is in resonance with a primal solid ?  The spiral flows sound like Birkeland currents and one wonders if what you are measuring is electrical or like electricity.  I tend to see Birkeland currents explaining serpent cults.  Perhaps things were more electrical in the past producing more visible Birkeland currents and stronger flow through the fields that you measure.
Mo

Whatever this primal solid is, it is omni present, if You jump threads and think in bible terms, revelations 21:18 then the man that sees the house of god will see it as clear as glass.
So think of that as a solid as far as We are concerned, far denser than diamond, a crystal as such, and as hard as it is to think of everything You observe been part of that solid, and looking out of my window on a snowstorm , it sure is difficult to think of those snow flakes as just locally orientated collections of signals transferring about.
But thats what I consider they are, I am.
If again You look back into the bible watch for ANU, anunaki.
http://www.greatdreams.com/grace/100/110anu.html
Think of everything in terms of a duality of force with a centre point where signals travel from and back to that point.
I am Alpha and Omega.
To scale the galaxy is ANU The sun is ANU
The earth is ANU
You are ANU, Every atom is ANU, every finite part of atom is ANU.
The force that empowers anu is the life force, the more You have , the more movement or switching ability you have
And all apparent movement is switching in this primal sea of such tensile solidity that it appears not to be there, as clear as glass.
All dimensions , all time can exist at once in this substance.
Now is merely the switched state that is present, and everything is permanently switching
All is ONE, is not new age twaddle, litterally all is one.
Once You have this comprehension then the occult world begins to make sense, and the life force is all empowering, anything can be anything, all is one, but the force is what empowers that one substance to tranmute into whatever orginisation locally it is.
Think of what may be concentrated , in a concentration camp?
Think of that empoweremnt been focussed, into say a ball.
Kevin



electrobleme

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Could a memristive/artifical device connect to the "Akashic Records" ?

Could something man made like a Memristor or computer system connect to the "Akashic Records" ? What would happen if it did? Would we be able to understand what information we were getting back?

I remember when i was young and doing logic circuit diagrams in electronics and the lecturer told us that sometimes software could design circuits where it seemed to humans that there were redundant parts. According to the logic of the logic circuit if you took away a tiny part it should make no difference, as logically it was not needed by the circuit to work. Yet if you removed it sometimes the circuit just would not work. Could this in anyway be similar to accessing something not visibly physical? Or was it just old software and circuits?

** Experimental demonstration of associative memory with memristive neural networks (pdf)


Mo

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Consider these sites about time travel:
It's about time:
http://www.rexresearch.com/time/time.htm

THE HYPERDIMENSIONAL OSCILLATOR:
http://www.lifetechnology.org/hyperdimensional.htm

"Paranormal Pictures" Tom Bearden:
http://www.rexresearch.com/radphoto/1radphot.htm

John Dee's Aztec Scrying Mirror:
http://miskatonicmuseum.blogspot.com/2009/10/john-dees-aztec-scrying-mirror.html

I have a few others but they can no longer be found on the internet.
Mo

electrobleme

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Smoking Mirrors - access(ories) or viewing the Akashic Records
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2010, 17:42:28 »
thanks for the links Mo, well interesting

What are the different accessories that humans have used to help us access(ories) or view the Akashic Records? Meditation and the physical/mental training/tuning of the body is one. Drugs are another. As your link on
John Dee's Aztec Scrying Mirror suggests physical objects must be included and there is a long list but Dr John Dee's Speculum is very interesting.

Do these physical aids actually access the Akashic Records or do they help us to tune in or polarise the frequency/energy. Changing or filtering the message/waves that are there, similar to 3D photographs/TV/films or like polaroid lenses? Is it only natural materials that can do this or are they the most famous becuase that was what was about when more people were accepting of the spirit world and were more in tune with nature?


Quote
Obsidian mirror

The Mexica people made mirrors of varying sizes with cut iron pyrites and obsidian (a volcanic glass). They were sometimes used in divination and healing practices. For example, if a child was suffering from 'soul loss' the healer would look at the reflection of the child's image in a mirror or a container with water. If the image were clear the child would soon recover; if it were shadowy, the soul had been lost. Like the Mexica, some people in parts of Mexico today believe that 'soul loss' is a cause of illness.

Mirrors were also associated with Tezcatlipoca, the Mexica god of rulers, warriors and sorcerers. His name can be translated as 'Smoking Mirror'. In many depictions during the Postclassic period (AD 900/1000-1521) his foot is replaced by a mirror.

Obsidian, ranging in colour from almost black (as here) to translucent green, came from various sources in Mesoamerica. At least six major sources are known in Central Mexico, in the states of Mexico, Hidalgo, Puebla and Michoacan. The most important source before European contact was Pachuca, in Hidalgo, which produced a beautiful green obsidian. Obsidian was also used for scraping and cutting tools, as well as for ornaments and carvings.

*The people and culture we know as 'Aztec' referred to themselves as the Mexica (pronounced Me-shee-ka).
Obsidian mirror | britishmuseum.org


Quote
Obsidan and granite are clever mirror materials. Formed as molten ingots much like glass, these materials were cooled or ammealed slowly over centeruries and thus thier internal grain structures have very few stresses. Severl people have made mirrors from these materials but they report that obsidian and granite are much harder than glass and require considerable more work to polish correctly. Obsidian has a higher thermal conductivity than glass and thus the mirror tends to come to temperature more rapidly at the start of an observing run
Unusual Telescopes | book by By Peter L. Manly


This quote reminded me that the natural materials have very different physical properties and some of them I would not have considered. Its not just what they look like, what they are made of but how they were made and things like what these actually mean to their own energy and place in the Electric Universe.


Quote
Dr Dee...and his references to "the principal stone', 'the first sanctified stone', 'the holy stone', and the 'angelical stone'
The Magical Speculum of Dr Dee (British Museum)


« Last Edit: January 13, 2010, 20:36:02 by electrobleme »

peter

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Mo - the idea that our past trauma might stop us connecting fully to the "Akashic Records Concept" - is this something human stopping us or is it the EU stopping us from accessing it fully?
electrobleme


There is a resonance now with the past that makes our whole body express genes the same as they were in the past trauma.  Panic attacks are like that.  Some situations resonate strongly with a past trauma.  But it is the effect on the body below consciousness that is insidious.  A stress is produced that over activates our genes.

But it is the actual trauma of the past that changes our ancestor's genes, and we inherit those genes.  I think that it is these damaged genes that stop us having all sorts of different abilities.  So it becomes a matter of dealing with the past.  And it is here that the EU leads to a breakthrough in understanding the past.

If humans then something like shock trauma we suffer from now, stopping or blocking access to bad memories that may damage us mentally. or we are not ready to confront them.
electrobleme

Mo, thanks for this very interesting insight. You delivered a important key for a deeper knowledge.

In fact the Bible tells about a "trauma" that occurred at the very beginning of the humanity, where Adam and Eve disconnected from the Highest Consciousness. They deliberately decided to "make their own thing", but they don't recognized that the human cannot rule himself. Or can a Atom rule himself?

Maybe you know the theory of Morphic Fields that Rupert Sheldrake proposed several years ago.
This fields builds the "form" of a life form, the DNA only the information for single parts (enzymes,hormones,proteins...). Without this field the cells of our body would not know where their place is and what their function is (in what they should specialize ... am I a liver-cell or a muscle-cell or a simple connective tissue-cell???).

Now imagine that: God said to the humans to fill the earth. But actually we are overfilling the earth.
In a human body the cells stops growing at a certain point. Not the humans. In a human body the cells works together, even if they are not from the same organ. Not the humans. Why?
Because the humans are disconnected from each other ("you shall love each other") and they have not anymore a morphic field that makes a communication between all humans possible (actually there is a morphic field of all humans, but it is not well working).
If this field would become stronger, than all humans would reconnect to each other, forming a collective consciousness that is much stronger and smarter than the sum of it.

Nikola Tesla indeed wrote that there is no such think as a individual. We are all ONE electromagnetic-wave.

I therefore believe that the collective has a trauma and that all individuals suffer under this condition. If more people could reconnect to the collective memory, they would attune their thoughts and actions for the best of all. It is like a magnet. A magnet builds a big magnetic field. Most of its atoms are aligned in one direction. If not all atoms in a piece of iron are aligned in one direction, than it forms not a strong magnetic field. But if the single atoms should "decide" on their own to align in one direction, than the field would become stronger. All this talking and writing about an awakening of the collective consciousness is similar to the magnetic field of iron.

kevin

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Consider all of the head dresses worn.
I can assure You that feathers have a clockwise orientated field around them, thus it is where that field or concentration of fields is placed in relation to any other field( you)
The field of the feathers will reflect/refract as did the field of the bird.
To think like a bird one must be able to think like a bird?
A bear skin will have the local field of a bear, wear it and feel the field of the bear.
Superconducting materials are now been made, they will act as whatever field they are subjected to as they solidify.
The Joe cell is the Joe cell because it was seeded( sperm0 by Joe.
The alien craft will operate as per the beings operating them, they will be them.
The materials will have their DNA signiture within the material.
It's all by field.
Biefeld Brown
kevin

electrobleme

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Does technology and society help/hinder accessing the "Akashic Records" ?
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2010, 19:28:40 »

How do technological/society advances change our ability to access the "Akashic Records"

Things help us to access the "Akashic Records" or at least get our body in tune with the natural power/energy/frequency that vibrates and energises the Electric Universe, the Electric Earth and us Electric Humans.

Meditation and your life style is one of them. Working on or with the land in a good way "somehow" makes you feel better. Some artists get "inspiration" from the countryside, while others need the hustle/busy/energy of cities/people. Whatever flicks your switch.

When your body/mind is in a good state you feel/have/experience more energy/ideas/happiness/peace/excitement. When your brain/body is in chaos you can have very different experiences.

Changes in society/technology must affect humans and our ability to tune in to the energy of the Electric Universe. From losing our connection with Mother Nature, to not believing or even starting to accept that there is anything other than what we can see (apart from of course Dark Stuff like Dark Matter/Energy which we can not observe or measure but supposedly makes up 80-95% of the Universe...). Science has made a lot of people not accept the possibility of even things being slightly different. From spirits/ghosts to any other theory about the Universe. People even doubt ESP even though they experience it many times!

So meditating, beliefs and ways of life will change body and mind and our access/tuning abilities to the "Akashic Records". What has the internet done to us humans? How has it rewired our brain and therefore our tuning/frequency ability?

Everything to do with entertainment/knowledge is getting quicker and faster. Power reading, films, music and of course we now have Twitter for ultrafast news. ultrafast entertainment, ultrafast reading, ultrafast thinking? Or should that be micronews, microentertainment, microreading, microthinking?

The article below starts off ok but then it really turns up the heat, so hang in there. Although I found it funny that an article on how the internet is stopping us from reading long things is itself quite long! Or did the author do this and save the gems for those who managed, in this twitterVerse, to read the whole thing?

The original version is here if you find that easier to read

Quote
Is Google Making Us Stupid? "What the Internet is doing to our brains"

"Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Bowman, having nearly been sent to a deep-space death by the malfunctioning machine, is calmly, coldly disconnecting the memory circuits that control its artificial “ brain. “Dave, my mind is going,” HAL says, forlornly. “I can feel it. I can feel it.”

I can feel it, too. Over the past few years I’ve had an uncomfortable sense that someone, or something, has been tinkering with my brain, remapping the neural circuitry, reprogramming the memory. My mind isn’t going—so far as I can tell—but it’s changing. I’m not thinking the way I used to think. I can feel it most strongly when I’m reading. Immersing myself in a book or a lengthy article used to be easy. My mind would get caught up in the narrative or the turns of the argument, and I’d spend hours strolling through long stretches of prose. That’s rarely the case anymore. Now my concentration often starts to drift after two or three pages. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do. I feel as if I’m always dragging my wayward brain back to the text. The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle.

I think I know what’s going on. For more than a decade now, I’ve been spending a lot of time online, searching and surfing and sometimes adding to the great databases of the Internet. The Web has been a godsend to me as a writer. Research that once required days in the stacks or periodical rooms of libraries can now be done in minutes. A few Google searches, some quick clicks on hyperlinks, and I’ve got the telltale fact or pithy quote I was after. Even when I’m not working, I’m as likely as not to be foraging in the Web’s info-thickets’reading and writing e-mails, scanning headlines and blog posts, watching videos and listening to podcasts, or just tripping from link to link to link. (Unlike footnotes, to which they’re sometimes likened, hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)

For me, as for others, the Net is becoming a universal medium, the conduit for most of the information that flows through my eyes and ears and into my mind. The advantages of having immediate access to such an incredibly rich store of information are many, and they’ve been widely described and duly applauded. “The perfect recall of silicon memory,” Wired’s Clive Thompson has written, “can be an enormous boon to thinking.” But that boon comes at a price. As the media theorist Marshall McLuhan pointed out in the 1960s, media are not just passive channels of information. They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.

I’m not the only one. When I mention my troubles with reading to friends and acquaintances—literary types, most of them—many say they’re having similar experiences. The more they use the Web, the more they have to fight to stay focused on long pieces of writing. Some of the bloggers I follow have also begun mentioning the phenomenon. Scott Karp, who writes a blog about online media, recently confessed that he has stopped reading books altogether. “I was a lit major in college, and used to be [a] voracious book reader,” he wrote. “What happened?” He speculates on the answer: “What if I do all my reading on the web not so much because the way I read has changed, i.e. I’m just seeking convenience, but because the way I THINK has changed?”

Bruce Friedman, who blogs regularly about the use of computers in medicine, also has described how the Internet has altered his mental habits. “I now have almost totally lost the ability to read and absorb a longish article on the web or in print,” he wrote earlier this year. A pathologist who has long been on the faculty of the University of Michigan Medical School, Friedman elaborated on his comment in a telephone conversation with me. His thinking, he said, has taken on a “staccato” quality, reflecting the way he quickly scans short passages of text from many sources online. “I can’t read War and Peace  anymore,” he admitted. “I’ve lost the ability to do that. Even a blog post of more than three or four paragraphs is too much to absorb. I skim it.”

Anecdotes alone don’t prove much. And we still await the long-term neurological and psychological experiments that will provide a definitive picture of how Internet use affects cognition. But a recently published study of online research habits , conducted by scholars from University College London, suggests that we may well be in the midst of a sea change in the way we read and think. As part of the five-year research program, the scholars examined computer logs documenting the behavior of visitors to two popular research sites, one operated by the British Library and one by a U.K. educational consortium, that provide access to journal articles, e-books, and other sources of written information. They found that people using the sites exhibited “a form of skimming activity,” hopping from one source to another and rarely returning to any source they’d already visited. They typically read no more than one or two pages of an article or book before they would “bounce” out to another site. Sometimes they’d save a long article, but there’s no evidence that they ever went back and actually read it. The authors of the study report:

"It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. It almost seems that they go online to avoid reading in the traditional sense."

Thanks to the ubiquity of text on the Internet, not to mention the popularity of text-messaging on cell phones, we may well be reading more today than we did in the 1970s or 1980s, when television was our medium of choice. But it’s a different kind of reading, and behind it lies a different kind of thinking—perhaps even a new sense of the self. “We are not only what we read,” says Maryanne Wolf, a developmental psychologist at Tufts University and the author of Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. “We are how we read.” Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace. When we read online, she says, we tend to become “mere decoders of information.” Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.

Reading, explains Wolf, is not an instinctive skill for human beings. It’s not etched into our genes the way speech is. We have to teach our minds how to translate the symbolic characters we see into the language we understand. And the media or other technologies we use in learning and practicing the craft of reading play an important part in shaping the neural circuits inside our brains. Experiments demonstrate that readers of ideograms, such as the Chinese, develop a mental circuitry for reading that is very different from the circuitry found in those of us whose written language employs an alphabet. The variations extend across many regions of the brain, including those that govern such essential cognitive functions as memory and the interpretation of visual and auditory stimuli. We can expect as well that the circuits woven by our use of the Net will be different from those woven by our reading of books and other printed works.

 Sometime in 1882, Friedrich Nietzsche bought a typewriter—a Malling-Hansen Writing Ball, to be precise. His vision was failing, and keeping his eyes focused on a page had become exhausting and painful, often bringing on crushing headaches. He had been forced to curtail his writing, and he feared that he would soon have to give it up. The typewriter rescued him, at least for a time. Once he had mastered touch-typing, he was able to write with his eyes closed, using only the tips of his fingers. Words could once again flow from his mind to the page.

But the machine had a subtler effect on his work. One of Nietzsche’s friends, a composer, noticed a change in the style of his writing. His already terse prose had become even tighter, more telegraphic. “Perhaps you will through this instrument even take to a new idiom,” the friend wrote in a letter, noting that, in his own work, his “‘thoughts’ in music and language often depend on the quality of pen and paper.”

“You are right,” Nietzsche replied, “our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts.” Under the sway of the machine, writes the German media scholar Friedrich A. Kittler , Nietzsche’s prose “changed from arguments to aphorisms, from thoughts to puns, from rhetoric to telegram style.”

The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case. James Olds, a professor of neuroscience who directs the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, says that even the adult mind “is very plastic.” Nerve cells routinely break old connections and form new ones. “The brain,” according to Olds, “has the ability to reprogram itself on the fly, altering the way it functions.”

As we use what the sociologist Daniel Bell has called our “intellectual technologies”—the tools that extend our mental rather than our physical capacities—we inevitably begin to take on the qualities of those technologies. The mechanical clock, which came into common use in the 14th century, provides a compelling example. In Technics and Civilization, the historian and cultural critic Lewis Mumford  described how the clock “disassociated time from human events and helped create the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences.” The “abstract framework of divided time” became “the point of reference for both action and thought.”

The clock’s methodical ticking helped bring into being the scientific mind and the scientific man. But it also took something away. As the late MIT computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum  observed in his 1976 book, Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation, the conception of the world that emerged from the widespread use of timekeeping instruments “remains an impoverished version of the older one, for it rests on a rejection of those direct experiences that formed the basis for, and indeed constituted, the old reality.” In deciding when to eat, to work, to sleep, to rise, we stopped listening to our senses and started obeying the clock.

The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level.

The Internet promises to have particularly far-reaching effects on cognition. In a paper published in 1936, the British mathematician Alan Turing  proved that a digital computer, which at the time existed only as a theoretical machine, could be programmed to perform the function of any other information-processing device. And that’s what we’re seeing today. The Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It’s becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and TV.

When the Net absorbs a medium, that medium is re-created in the Net’s image. It injects the medium’s content with hyperlinks, blinking ads, and other digital gewgaws, and it surrounds the content with the content of all the other media it has absorbed. A new e-mail message, for instance, may announce its arrival as we’re glancing over the latest headlines at a newspaper’s site. The result is to scatter our attention and diffuse our concentration.

The Net’s influence doesn’t end at the edges of a computer screen, either. As people’s minds become attuned to the crazy quilt of Internet media, traditional media have to adapt to the audience’s new expectations. Television programs add text crawls and pop-up ads, and magazines and newspapers shorten their articles, introduce capsule summaries, and crowd their pages with easy-to-browse info-snippets. When, in March of this year, TheNew York Times decided to devote the second and third pages of every edition to article abstracts , its design director, Tom Bodkin, explained that the “shortcuts” would give harried readers a quick “taste” of the day’s news, sparing them the “less efficient” method of actually turning the pages and reading the articles. Old media have little choice but to play by the new-media rules.

Never has a communications system played so many roles in our lives—or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts—as the Internet does today. Yet, for all that’s been written about the Net, there’s been little consideration of how, exactly, it’s reprogramming us. The Net’s intellectual ethic remains obscure.

 About the same time that Nietzsche started using his typewriter, an earnest young man named Frederick Winslow Taylor  carried a stopwatch into the Midvale Steel plant in Philadelphia and began a historic series of experiments aimed at improving the efficiency of the plant’s machinists. With the approval of Midvale’s owners, he recruited a group of factory hands, set them to work on various metalworking machines, and recorded and timed their every movement as well as the operations of the machines. By breaking down every job into a sequence of small, discrete steps and then testing different ways of performing each one, Taylor created a set of precise instructions—an “algorithm,” we might say today—for how each worker should work. Midvale’s employees grumbled about the strict new regime, claiming that it turned them into little more than automatons, but the factory’s productivity soared.

More than a hundred years after the invention of the steam engine, the Industrial Revolution had at last found its philosophy and its philosopher. Taylor’s tight industrial choreography—his “system,” as he liked to call it—was embraced by manufacturers throughout the country and, in time, around the world. Seeking maximum speed, maximum efficiency, and maximum output, factory owners used time-and-motion studies to organize their work and configure the jobs of their workers. The goal, as Taylor defined it in his celebrated 1911 treatise, The Principles of Scientific Management, was to identify and adopt, for every job, the “one best method” of work and thereby to effect “the gradual substitution of science for rule of thumb throughout the mechanic arts.” Once his system was applied to all acts of manual labor, Taylor assured his followers, it would bring about a restructuring not only of industry but of society, creating a utopia of perfect efficiency. “In the past the man has been first,” he declared; “in the future the system must be first.”

Taylor’s system is still very much with us; it remains the ethic of industrial manufacturing. And now, thanks to the growing power that computer engineers and software coders wield over our intellectual lives, Taylor’s ethic is beginning to govern the realm of the mind as well. The Internet is a machine designed for the efficient and automated collection, transmission, and manipulation of information, and its legions of programmers are intent on finding the “one best method”—the perfect algorithm—to carry out every mental movement of what we’ve come to describe as “knowledge work.”

Google’s headquarters, in Mountain View, California—the Googleplex—is the Internet’s high church, and the religion practiced inside its walls is Taylorism. Google, says its chief executive, Eric Schmidt, is “a company that’s founded around the science of measurement,” and it is striving to “systematize everything” it does. Drawing on the terabytes of behavioral data it collects through its search engine and other sites, it carries out thousands of experiments a day, according to the Harvard Business Review, and it uses the results to refine the algorithms that increasingly control how people find information and extract meaning from it. What Taylor did for the work of the hand, Google is doing for the work of the mind.

The company has declared that its mission is “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” It seeks to develop “the perfect search engine,” which it defines as something that “understands exactly what you mean and gives you back exactly what you want.” In Google’s view, information is a kind of commodity, a utilitarian resource that can be mined and processed with industrial efficiency. The more pieces of information we can “access” and the faster we can extract their gist, the more productive we become as thinkers.

Where does it end? Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the gifted young men who founded Google while pursuing doctoral degrees in computer science at Stanford, speak frequently of their desire to turn their search engine into an artificial intelligence, a HAL-like machine that might be connected directly to our brains. “The ultimate search engine is something as smart as people—or smarter,” Page said in a speech a few years back. “For us, working on search is a way to work on artificial intelligence.” In a 2004 interview with Newsweek, Brin said, “Certainly if you had all the world’s information directly attached to your brain, or an artificial brain that was smarter than your brain, you’d be better off.” Last year, Page told a convention of scientists that Google is “really trying to build artificial intelligence and to do it on a large scale.”

Such an ambition is a natural one, even an admirable one, for a pair of math whizzes with vast quantities of cash at their disposal and a small army of computer scientists in their employ. A fundamentally scientific enterprise, Google is motivated by a desire to use technology, in Eric Schmidt’s words, “to solve problems that have never been solved before,” and artificial intelligence is the hardest problem out there. Why wouldn’t Brin and Page want to be the ones to crack it?

Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.

The idea that our minds should operate as high-speed data-processing machines is not only built into the workings of the Internet, it is the network’s reigning business model as well. The faster we surf across the Web—the more links we click and pages we view—the more opportunities Google and other companies gain to collect information about us and to feed us advertisements. Most of the proprietors of the commercial Internet have a financial stake in collecting the crumbs of data we leave behind as we flit from link to link—the more crumbs, the better. The last thing these companies want is to encourage leisurely reading or slow, concentrated thought. It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.

Maybe I’m just a worrywart. Just as there’s a tendency to glorify technological progress, there’s a countertendency to expect the worst of every new tool or machine. In Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates bemoaned the development of writing. He feared that, as people came to rely on the written word as a substitute for the knowledge they used to carry inside their heads, they would, in the words of one of the dialogue’s characters, “cease to exercise their memory and become forgetful.” And because they would be able to “receive a quantity of information without proper instruction,” they would “be thought very knowledgeable when they are for the most part quite ignorant.” They would be “filled with the conceit of wisdom instead of real wisdom.” Socrates wasn’t wrong—the new technology did often have the effects he feared—but he was shortsighted. He couldn’t foresee the many ways that writing and reading would serve to spread information, spur fresh ideas, and expand human knowledge (if not wisdom).

The arrival of Gutenberg’s printing press, in the 15th century, set off another round of teeth gnashing. The Italian humanist Hieronimo Squarciafico worried that the easy availability of books would lead to intellectual laziness, making men “less studious” and weakening their minds. Others argued that cheaply printed books and broadsheets would undermine religious authority, demean the work of scholars and scribes, and spread sedition and debauchery. As New York University professor Clay Shirky notes, “Most of the arguments made against the printing press were correct, even prescient.” But, again, the doomsayers were unable to imagine the myriad blessings that the printed word would deliver.

So, yes, you should be skeptical of my skepticism. Perhaps those who dismiss critics of the Internet as Luddites or nostalgists will be proved correct, and from our hyperactive, data-stoked minds will spring a golden age of intellectual discovery and universal wisdom. Then again, the Net isn’t the alphabet, and although it may replace the printing press, it produces something altogether different. The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.

If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture. In a recent essay, the playwright Richard Foreman  eloquently described what’s at stake:

"I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”"

As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”

I’m haunted by that scene in 2001. What makes it so poignant, and so weird, is the computer’s emotional response to the disassembly of its mind: its despair as one circuit after another goes dark, its childlike pleading with the astronaut—“I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m afraid”—and its final reversion to what can only be called a state of innocence. HAL’s outpouring of feeling contrasts with the emotionlessness that characterizes the human figures in the film, who go about their business with an almost robotic efficiency. Their thoughts and actions feel scripted, as if they’re following the steps of an algorithm. In the world of 2001, people have become so machinelike that the most human character turns out to be a machine. That’s the essence of Kubrick’s dark prophecy: as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.

Is Google Making Us Stupid? "What the Internet is doing to our brains" by Nicholas Carr

electrobleme

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you think or are what your wear?
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2010, 19:38:41 »
Consider all of the head dresses worn.
I can assure You that feathers have a clockwise orientated field around them, thus it is where that field or concentration of fields is placed in relation to any other field( you)
The field of the feathers will reflect/refract as did the field of the bird.
To think like a bird one must be able to think like a bird?
A bear skin will have the local field of a bear, wear it and feel the field of the bear.
Superconducting materials are now been made, they will act as whatever field they are subjected to as they solidify.
The Joe cell is the Joe cell because it was seeded( sperm0 by Joe.
The alien craft will operate as per the beings operating them, they will be them.
The materials will have their DNA signiture within the material.
It's all by field.
Biefeld Brown
kevin

Why Kings wore crowns and fur gowns of the kingly animals? Why Shamen do the same thing? Why people feel more powerful or business like in a suit? Why natural materials feel so much better than manmade? How come natural products are so much better for us (less sweat) etc, what are the odds of that? Or is it that they are designed or naturally work with our bodies?

« Last Edit: January 13, 2010, 21:26:47 by electrobleme »

peter

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Consider all of the head dresses worn.
I can assure You that feathers have a clockwise orientated field around them, thus it is where that field or concentration of fields is placed in relation to any other field( you)
The field of the feathers will reflect/refract as did the field of the bird.
To think like a bird one must be able to think like a bird?
A bear skin will have the local field of a bear, wear it and feel the field of the bear.
Superconducting materials are now been made, they will act as whatever field they are subjected to as they solidify.
The Joe cell is the Joe cell because it was seeded( sperm0 by Joe.
The alien craft will operate as per the beings operating them, they will be them.
The materials will have their DNA signiture within the material.
It's all by field.
Biefeld Brown
kevin

Hi Kevin!

Man, searching for the keywords "Joe Cell" I got in my mind to post an article here as first. But you has read my thoughts.
You're lucky man, because I believe that we are all ONE, else I would accuse you for steeling my own thoughts  ;)

Maybe we all here in this forum create a morphic field and we share our thoughts telepathically and we form a higher consciousness. The so called "EverythingIsElectric-Morphic-Field".

I imagine the universe as a hologram and the connections through time and space are possible because of similar-structures. So if two things wants to communicate, even if they are millions of light year distant, they need similar structures (or patterns) in order to share information faster than the speed of light. (keyword Quantum-Entanglement)

For example:
- Two people decide to communicate with each other by a code. They need first to create a code by consensus.
- And if they decide to communicate with radio signals, they need to choose first a common frequency.

If we want to communicate with the Universe, with God, with the collective mind, Akasha etc. than we need the right frequency or a pattern that is similar to it.
Even if the key is not very similar to that to the other side, we could succeed. Because the intention is the key, our will to communicate!

We have the key already inside us!

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread532721/pg1 - The Fractal Nature of Consciousness

kevin

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Peter,
          Hello,
I feel this is why scientists on different continents suddenly find similer discoveries.
a lot of the paranoia about spying may actually be because of this attraction by like thinking.
If We all were to realise this power We could rid the world of the war crazed loonies that operate at the moment.
I too sense a hologram, but in a solid, litterally all been ONE.
Thus every tiny part is a holographic copy of the rest.
the transport about that solid I detect as phase conjugate optical lasers.
sagittarius A been a central sort of pump.
The galaxy will then be within a larger scale similer.
it's all about scale, with phase conjugate fields been attracted to each other to co-join.
I am a dowser, I atune to radio fibonacci.
Kevin

Mo

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Do these physical aids actually access the Akashic Records or do they help us to tune in or polarise the frequency/energy.
electrobleme


Mirrors reflect and can change the phase of the incoming light. If one considers that the Akashic record is with us all the time as a memory, then the light from the Akashic record will change phase and reflect back to its source having some cancelling effect. This may help free oneself from the effects of the nearby, or carried with one, Akashic record. And so one may become more sensitive, with the usual influence being diminished. However crystal ball reading is a matter of reducing visual stimulus allowing a more sensitive state.
Mo