Author Topic: Don't use the E or B word - anything other than electric or birkeland currents  (Read 56309 times)

electrobleme

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Anything other than the words electric + birkeland currents with plasma?


Why do astronomers and scientists do everything they can to describe things without using the words electric or birkeland currents when describing space stuff? It appears you can not have a magnetic field in space without the flow of electrical current. There are incredible "magnetic" events happening all over the universe yet the electricity needed to create magnetic fields is not mentioned.

The earth and the sun connect magnetically every 8 minutes

Sunspots are caused by magnetic events.

white dwarfs pulling matter from companion stars, and double stars with strong magnetic activity

2 answers. Either they, although scientists with degrees etc, dont know that electricity is needed to produce magnetic fields, or, they dont know actually believe that electricity exists in space? Of course you have the conspiracy angle to it in that they are on purpose ignoring it, anything other than the dreaded E word.

Magnetic ropes, stringy things....might they be electrically charged plasma, Birkeland currents as they are known?


Birkeland Currents information - wikipedia and post below about the Birkeland Nebula


2010 posts

** Spiraling space tornado 2 trillion miles long - could it be a Birkeland Current?
** Milky Way very magnetic - all previous Milky Way calculations and mathematical models wrong?


2009 posts
** Magnetic Portals Connect Sun and Earth every 8 minutes - NASA says so
** This interpretation is problematic because... nature has got it wrong?
** The only word not mentioned is electricity
** Mercury's magnetic space weather circuit - anything to do with electricity?
** Magnetic reconnections - are they Birkeland Currents?
** Its a magnetic universe? Solar Systems Giant Ribbon is a source of particles
** Orion Nebula - Orion Source I
** Space Tornados or Birkeland currents?
** The Double Helix Nebula - The Birkeland Current nebula?
** Cosmic Jets / GRBs have magnetic fields! Shock.  - Will they find more magnetic fields they ask? Hmmmmm.
** (Earth's) Global Birkeland Currents Data Product System - auroral Birkeland currents scientific project !!!!
** "Local Fluff" - 30 light years wide, magnetized, 6000 C - not local. not due only to magnetism.
** What happens next? What is not mentioned next? - the Northern Lights Show


Quote
Space Tornadoes Cause a Stir


The idea of a giant radiant pillar rising up from the earth to the sky would have sounded too fantastic to be true – until recently.

In April of 2009, NASA’s fleet of THEMIS satellites detected vast electrical tornadoes about 40,000 miles above the night side of the earth, on the boundary between the solar wind and the earth’s magnetosphere.

Since the 1990s, a handful of ‘plasma mythologists’ had assumed the former existence of a stupendous, luminous sky column that was visible from almost every part of the earth. The evidence for this was the prominent place allotted to this axis mundi or ‘world axis’ in detailed cosmological traditions from hundreds of cultures dotted around the globe.

The column was widely portrayed as a prodigious mountain, tree, rope, bridge, ladder or pathway and was universally characterised by notions of centrality, vitality, vorticity, and luminosity: the conspicuous position it occupied in the firmament earned it an association with the ‘navel’, ‘heart’ or ‘centre’ of the world; its agility made it seem as if it was imbued with life, like a giant divine creature breathing life into the surrounding cosmos; its filamentary extremities were subject to warping and twisting, while the column itself was seen to be entwined by spiralling filaments frequently compared to snakes; and the splendour of the light it emitted repeatedly invited comparison to the sun and to lightning.

Scores of mythical traditions from all inhabited continents detail the eventual collapse and disappearance of this mighty lightning-like pillar. The Maya of Valladolid, Yucatán, recalled the existence of “a road suspended in the sky” over the peninsula: “For some reason this rope was cut, the blood flowed out, and the rope vanished forever.”
Space Tornadoes Cause a Stir - thunderbolts .info

« Last Edit: June 04, 2010, 14:36:04 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Magnetic Portals Connect Sun and Earth every 8 minutes - NASA says so
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2009, 10:18:54 »

Magnetic Portals Connect Sun and Earth every 8 minutes

It seems you can not have magnetic fields without the flow of electrical current.
Flow of high energy particles sound like a flow of electrical current and charge.
Magnetic field lines from the Earth to the Sun might be electrical current lines known as Birkeland Currents.
Magnetic cylinders = Birkeland Currents.


Quote
Oct. 30, 2008: During the time it takes you to read this article, something will happen high overhead that until recently many scientists didn't believe in. A magnetic portal will open, linking Earth to the sun 93 million miles away. Tons of high-energy particles may flow through the opening before it closes again, around the time you reach the end of the page.

"It's called a flux transfer event or 'FTE,'" says space physicist David Sibeck of the Goddard Space Flight Center. "Ten years ago I was pretty sure they didn't exist, but now the evidence is incontrovertible."

Indeed, today Sibeck is telling an international assembly of space physicists at the 2008 Plasma Workshop in Huntsville, Alabama, that FTEs are not just common, but possibly twice as common as anyone had ever imagined.

Right: An artist's concept of Earth's magnetic field connecting to the sun's--a.k.a. a "flux transfer event"--with a spacecraft on hand to measure particles and fields. [Larger image]

Researchers have long known that the Earth and sun must be connected. Earth's magnetosphere (the magnetic bubble that surrounds our planet) is filled with particles from the sun that arrive via the solar wind and penetrate the planet's magnetic defenses. They enter by following magnetic field lines that can be traced from terra firma all the way back to the sun's atmosphere.


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"We used to think the connection was permanent and that solar wind could trickle into the near-Earth environment anytime the wind was active," says Sibeck. "We were wrong. The connections are not steady at all. They are often brief, bursty and very dynamic."

Several speakers at the Workshop have outlined how FTEs form: On the dayside of Earth (the side closest to the sun), Earth's magnetic field presses against the sun's magnetic field. Approximately every eight minutes, the two fields briefly merge or "reconnect," forming a portal through which particles can flow. The portal takes the form of a magnetic cylinder about as wide as Earth. The European Space Agency's fleet of four Cluster spacecraft and NASA's five THEMIS probes have flown through and surrounded these cylinders, measuring their dimensions and sensing the particles that shoot through. "They're real," says Sibeck.

Now that Cluster and THEMIS have directly sampled FTEs, theorists can use those measurements to simulate FTEs in their computers and predict how they might behave. Space physicist Jimmy Raeder of the University of New Hampshire presented one such simulation at the Workshop. He told his colleagues that the cylindrical portals tend to form above Earth's equator and then roll over Earth's winter pole. In December, FTEs roll over the north pole; in July they roll over the south pole.

Sibeck believes this is happening twice as often as previously thought. "I think there are two varieties of FTEs: active and passive." Active FTEs are magnetic cylinders that allow particles to flow through rather easily; they are important conduits of energy for Earth's magnetosphere. Passive FTEs are magnetic cylinders that offer more resistance; their internal structure does not admit such an easy flow of particles and fields. (For experts: Active FTEs form at equatorial latitudes when the IMF tips south; passive FTEs form at higher latitudes when the IMF tips north.) Sibeck has calculated the properties of passive FTEs and he is encouraging his colleagues to hunt for signs of them in data from THEMIS and Cluster. "Passive FTEs may not be very important, but until we know more about them we can't be sure."

There are many unanswered questions: Why do the portals form every 8 minutes? How do magnetic fields inside the cylinder twist and coil? "We're doing some heavy thinking about this at the Workshop," says Sibeck.

Meanwhile, high above your head, a new portal is opening, connecting your planet to the sun.
Magnetic Portals Connect Sun and Earth - nasa .gov
« Last Edit: September 23, 2009, 10:29:03 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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This interpretation is problematic because... nature has got it wrong?
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2009, 10:28:17 »
Resolving a Galactic Mystery by ignoring what the facts (nature or the Universe) first tell you and imply?

Stupid nature, it does not know what its doing. Stupid Universe, always getting it wrong.  What sort of mathematician was the person who created the Universe. His sums dont add up. What it implies is not logical so we have to ignore it and work out what nature actually is showing and telling us, hidden behind what we can see and observe.



Quote
An extremely deep Chandra X-ray Observatory image of a region near the center of our galaxy has resolved a long-standing mystery about an X-ray glow along the plane of the galaxy. The glow in the region covered by the Chandra image was discovered to be caused by hundreds of point-like X-ray sources, implying that the glow along the plane of the galaxy is due to millions of such sources.

This image shows an infrared view from the Spitzer Space Telescope of the central region of the Milky Way, with a pullout showing a Chandra image of a region located only 1.4 degrees away from the center of the galaxy.

The so-called galactic ridge X-ray emission was first detected more than two decades ago using early X-ray observatories such as HEAO-1 and Exosat. The ridge was observed to extend about two degrees above and below the plane of the galaxy and about 40 degrees along the plane of the galaxy on either side of the galactic center. It appeared to be diffuse.

One interpretation of the galactic X-ray ridge is that it is emission from 100-million-degree gas. This interpretation is problematic because the disk of the galaxy is not massive enough to confine such hot gas, which should flow away in a wind. Replenishing the gas would then be a problem, since plausible sources of energy such as supernovas are not nearly powerful enough.

A very deep Chandra observation, lasting for about 12 days, was used to study the nature of this ridge emission. The field was chosen to be close enough to the galactic plane so that the ridge emission was strong, but in a region with relatively little absorption from dust and gas to maximize the number of sources that might be detected. A total of 473 sources were detected in an area of the sky only about 3 percent of the size of the full moon -- one of the highest densities of X-ray sources ever seen in our galaxy.

It was found that more than 80 percent of the seemingly diffuse ridge of X-ray emission was resolved into individual sources. These are believed to be mostly white dwarfs pulling matter from companion stars, and double stars with strong magnetic activity that are producing X-ray outbursts or flares that are similar to, but more powerful than, the flares seen on the sun. These stars are unrelated to the large-scale structures seen toward the center of the Spitzer image, which are probably caused by young massive stars.
Resolving a Galactic Mystery - nasa .gov
« Last Edit: September 23, 2009, 10:33:08 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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The only word not mentioned is electricity
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2009, 09:57:13 »
EU mantra - you can not have magnetic fields without electricity...

Quote
Astrophysicists Move Closer to Understanding the Beauty Behind Stellar Jets

Department of Energy Awards $2.8 Million to Simulate Jets in the Laboratory

Certain stars stream vast amounts of matter into space, creating some of the most beautiful objects in astronomers' telescopes. But while the astronomers can enjoy the beauty, they can't explain it.

Adam Frank, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester is hoping to change that.

Earlier this year, Frank and his colleague, Eric Blackman, professor of physics and astronomy, were part of what he called "one of the greatest astrophysical experiments that's ever been done." Recreating a stellar event in a laboratory is extremely difficult, says Frank, since most astrophysical phenomena require an entire star, "which is hard to fit in a lab."

But Frank, along with Professor Sergey Lebedev's team in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London, replicated the physics of a stellar jet in a laboratory, matching the known physics of jets amazingly well. That experiment was conducted using the Imperial College's MAGPIE pulsed power facility. Now, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded Frank and his team $2.8 million to take the experiment to the next level.

Along with researchers from Rice University and the University of California at San Diego, Frank and Lebedev will re-conduct the initial experiment and carry out new ones on Sandia National Laboratories' Z-Machine—an X-ray generator 10 times more powerful than the MAGPIE facility. The new grant will allow Frank and the team to replicate jets even more accurately, as well as to get new astronomical observations to nail down exactly how stellar jets evolve in nature.

"It's a whole new way of doing astrophysics," says Frank, who specializes in using supercomputers to simulate astrophysical phenomena. "The DOE grant allows us to deepen and extend an unusual international collaboration of plasma physicists, astronomers, and computational scientists. The grant is for five years and that means we have the time and resources to come together to answer a very difficult problem from very different angles."

The original experiment at Imperial College showed how "knots" form in stellar jets. Though jets are believed to emanate from a star as a steady stream of matter, they quickly become knotted and twisted, creating the astonishing shapes they are known for, says Frank. Astrophysicists had long debated what caused the knotting of jets, but Frank, Lebedev, and the team managed to recreate a small-scale version of these jets at the Imperial College' facility.

At Imperial College, Lebedev sent a high-powered pulse of energy into an aluminum disk. In just a few billions of a second, the aluminum began to evaporate, creating a cloud of plasma very similar to the plasma cloud surrounding a young star, says Frank. Where the energy flowed into the center of the disk, the aluminum evaporated completely, creating a hole through which a magnetic field, generated in the process, could penetrate.

The field initially pushed aside the plasma, forming a "bubble with a jet inside," says Frank, who carried out the astrophysical analysis of the experiment. As the field penetrated further and the bubble/jet system grew, the magnetic fields began to warp and twist. Almost immediately, a new magnetic bubble formed beneath the first bubble, and the process repeated itself, creating a series of broken bubbles in the plasma.

The resulting cloud of plasma, pinched in by the magnetic fields, so closely resembled what astrophysicists observe in real stellar jets that Frank believes the same physics underlies both. Frank says other aspects of the experiment, such as the way in which the jets radiatively cool the plasma in the same way jets radiatively cool their parent stars, make the series of experiments an important tool for studying stellar jets.

"We can see these beautiful jets in space, but we have no way to see what the magnetic fields look like," says Frank. "I can't go out and stick probes in a star, but here we can get some idea."
Astrophysicists Move Closer to Understanding the Beauty Behind Stellar Jets - rochester .edu

For more information of what they will find visit plasmascience.net run by Anthony Peratt who discovered Peratt's Instabilities. These are high energy Plasma Discharges that have occured in the skies of the earth and were witnessed by all the peoples of the earth. They carved the image of the Squatter Man (Squatting Man) into rocks known as petroglyphs and we still use the image today.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2009, 12:23:13 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Mercury's magnetic space weather circuit - anything to do with electricity?
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2009, 13:03:49 »

Mercury's magnetic circuit in a Magnetic Universe


Mercurys (electro) magnetic circuit and space weather diagram

Magnetopause current...plasmoid...flux rope..flux transfer events...spluttering...



spaceweather.com front page article on Mercurys magnetic circuit and space weather

Magnetic field...magnetic tornadoes...twisted bundles of magnetic fields...magnetic twisters....explosive magnetic reconnections...solar wind magnetic field boundary...maelstrom of magnetism...

Stay tuned for data!


« Last Edit: October 03, 2009, 09:27:59 by electrobleme »

electrobleme

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Magnetic reconnections - are they Birkeland Currents?
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2009, 13:23:15 »
magnetic reconnections look like Birkeland Curents?

"Magnetic reconnection could be the Universe's favourite way to make things explode. It operates anywhere magnetic fields pervade space - which is to say almost anywhere." - nasa .gov




Birkeland Currents are twisting, spiralling, rope like things in Space. Where you have plasma and electricity to be carried over distance it will normally take the form of a Birkeland Current. Flux Transfer Events, Flux Ropes, galactic jets are very likely to be Birkeland Currents. Magnetism is a secondary effect but in space no mention is made of what creates Magnetism. It is an Electrical Universe.



Birkeland Currents stuff on wikipedia


electrobleme

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Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System

Quote
Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System



October 15, 2009: For years, researchers have known that the solar system is surrounded by a vast bubble of magnetism. Called the "heliosphere," it springs from the sun and extends far beyond the orbit of Pluto, providing a first line of defense against cosmic rays and interstellar clouds that try to enter our local space. Although the heliosphere is huge and literally fills the sky, it emits no light and no one has actually seen it.

Until now.

NASA's IBEX (Interstellar Boundary Explorer) spacecraft has made the first all-sky maps of the heliosphere and the results have taken researchers by surprise. The maps are bisected by a bright, winding ribbon of unknown origin:

Above: IBEX's all-sky map of energetic neutral atom emission reveals a bright filament of unknown origin. V1 and V2 indicate the positions of the Voyager spacecraft. [more]

"This is a shocking new result," says IBEX principal investigator Dave McComas of the Southwest Research Institute. "We had no idea this ribbon existed--or what has created it. Our previous ideas about the outer heliosphere are going to have to be revised."


Although the ribbon looks bright in the IBEX map, it does not glow in any conventional sense. The ribbon is not a source of light, but rather a source of particles--energetic neutral atoms or ENAs. IBEX's sensors can detect these particles, which are produced in the outer heliosphere where the solar wind begins to slow down and mix with interstellar matter from outside the solar system.

"This ribbon winds between the two Voyager spacecraft and was not observed by either of them," notes Eric Christian, IBEX deputy mission scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "It's like having two weather stations, but missing the big storm that runs between them."

Unlike the Voyager spacecraft, which have spent decades traveling to the edge of the solar system for in situ sampling, IBEX stayed closer to home. It is in Earth orbit, spinning around and collecting ENAs from all directions. This gives IBEX the unique "big picture" view necessary to discover something as vast as the ribbon.

The ribbon also has fine structure--small filaments of ENA emission no more than a few degrees wide: image. The fine structure is as much of a mystery as the ribbon itself, researchers say.

One important clue: The ribbon runs perpendicular to the direction of the galactic magnetic field just outside the heliosphere, as shown in the illustration at right.

"That cannot be a coincidence," says McComas. But what does it mean? No one knows. "We're missing some fundamental aspect of the interaction between the heliosphere and the rest of the galaxy. Theorists are working like crazy to figure this out."

Understanding the physics of the outer heliosphere is important because of the role it plays in shielding the solar system against cosmic rays. The heliosphere's size and shape are key factors in determining its shielding power and, thus, how many cosmic rays reach Earth. For the first time, IBEX is revealing how the heliosphere might respond when it bumps into interstellar clouds and galactic magnetic fields.

"IBEX is now making a second all-sky map, and we're eager to see if the ribbon is changing," says McComas. "Watching the ribbon evolve--if it is evolving--could yield more clues."

Stay tuned for updates.

NASA - Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System

worth repeating because its such an important clue that will remain a mystery, in a gravity and magnetic universe.

Quote

One important clue: The ribbon runs perpendicular to the direction of the galactic magnetic field just outside the heliosphere, as shown in the illustration at right.

"That cannot be a coincidence," says McComas. But what does it mean? No one knows. "We're missing some fundamental aspect of the interaction between the heliosphere and the rest of the galaxy. Theorists are working like crazy to figure this out."
NASA - Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System



Quote
Scientists have known since the early part of the 19th century that electrical fields and magnetic fields are intimately related to each other and applications of this connection are found all around you. Moving electric charge (electric current) creates a magnetic field...

A changing magnetic field creates electrical current---an electric field...ames Clerk Maxwell (lived 1831--1879) put these ideas together and proposed that if a changing magnetic field can make an electric field, then a changing electric field (from an oscillating electric charge, for example) should make a magnetic field. A consequence of this is that changing electric and magnetic fields should trigger each other and these changing fields should move at a speed equal to the speed of light. To conclude this line of reasoning, Maxwell said that light is an electromagnetic wave. Later experiments confirmed Maxwells's theory.

Electric and magnetic fields oscillate together but perpendicular to each other and the electromagnetic wave moves in a direction perpendicular to both of the fields.
Electric and Magnetic Fields - astronomynotes .com



Quote
Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System

One important clue: The ribbon runs perpendicular to the direction of the galactic magnetic field just outside the heliosphere, as shown in the illustration at right.

"That cannot be a coincidence," says McComas. But what does it mean? No one knows. "We're missing some fundamental aspect of the interaction between the heliosphere and the rest of the galaxy. Theorists are working like crazy to figure this out."

Stay tuned for updates.

NASA - Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System

So you know the ribbon runs perpendicular to the direction of the galactic magnetic field , thats an important clue and cannot be a coincidence but what could cause the ribbon. What could cause a magnetic field perpendicular to it?

Quote
Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System

But what does it mean? No one knows. "We're missing some fundamental aspect of the interaction between the heliosphere and the rest of the galaxy. Theorists are working like crazy to figure this out."

Stay tuned for updates.

NASA - Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System


Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System

Quote
Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System
October 15th, 2009

Since it launched a year ago, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been monitoring heliosphere and how our Sun interacts with and the local interstellar medium — the gas and dust trapped in the vacuum of space. The first results from the mission, combined with data from the Cassini mission, are showing the heliosphere to be different from what researchers have previously thought. Data show an unexpected bright band or ribbon of surprisingly high-energy emissions. "We knew there would be energetic neutral atoms coming in from the very edge of the heliosphere, and our theories said there would be small variations in their emissions," said David McComas, IBEX Principal Investigator at a press conference on Thursday. "But instead we are seeing two-to-three hundred percent variations, and this is not entirely understood. Whatever we thought about this before is definitely not right."

The energies IBEX has observed range from 0.2 to 6.0 kiloelectron volts, and the scientists said its flux is two to three times greater than the ENA activity throughout the rest of the heliosphere. McComas and his colleagues said that no existing model can explain all the dominant features of this “ribbon.” Instead, they suggest that these new findings will prompt a change in our understanding of the heliosphere and the processes that shape it.

McComas suggested that the energetic neutral atom (ENA) ribbon could be caused by interactions between the heliosphere and the local interstellar magnetic field. "The local interstellar magnetic field is oriented in such a way that it correlates with the ribbon. If you 'paint' the ribbon on the boundary of the heliosphere, the magnetic field is like big bungie cords that pushing in along the sides and at southern part of the heliosphere. Somehow the magnetic field seems to be playing a dominant roll in these interactions, but we don't know it could produced these higher fluxes. We have to figure out what physics were are missing."

The solar wind streaks away from the sun in all directions at over a millions kilometers per hour. It creates a bubble in space around our solar system.

For the first ten billion kilometers of its radius, the solar wind travels at over a million kilometers per hour. It slows as it begins to collide with the interstellar medium, and the point where the solar wind slows down is the termination shock; the point where the interstellar medium and solar wind pressures balance is called the heliopause; the point where the interstellar medium, traveling in the opposite direction, slows down as it collides with the heliosphere is the bow shock.

The Voyager spacecraft have explored this region, but didn't detect the ribbon. Team member Eric Christian said the ribbon wound in between the location of Voyager 1 and 2, and they couldn't detect it in their immediate areas. Voyager 1 spacecraft encountered the helioshock in 2004 when it reached the region where the charged particles streaming off the sun hit the neutral gas from interstellar space. Voyager 2 followed into the solar system's edge in 2007. While these spacecraft made the first explorations of this region, IBEX is now revealing a a more complete picture, filling in where the Voyagers couldn't. Christian compared Voyager 1 and 2 to be like weather stations while IBEX is first weather satellite to provide more complete coverage.

McComas said his first reaction when the data started coming in was that of terror because he thought something must be wrong with the spacecraft. But as more data kept coming back each week, the team realized that they were wrong, and the spacecraft was right.

"Our next steps will be to go through all the detailed observations and rack them up against the various models and go find what it is that we are missing, what we’ve been leaving out," he said.
Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System - universetoday .com

Do not use that E word - Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System

Quote
Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System
October 15th, 2009
Data show an unexpected bright band or ribbon of surprisingly high-energy emissions. "We knew there would be energetic neutral atoms coming in from the very edge of the heliosphere, and our theories said there would be small variations in their emissions," said David McComas, IBEX Principal Investigator at a press conference on Thursday. "But instead we are seeing two-to-three hundred percent variations, and this is not entirely understood. Whatever we thought about this before is definitely not right."

McComas suggested that the energetic neutral atom (ENA) ribbon could be caused by interactions between the heliosphere and the local interstellar magnetic field. "The local interstellar magnetic field is oriented in such a way that it correlates with the ribbon. If you 'paint' the ribbon on the boundary of the heliosphere, the magnetic field is like big bungie cords that pushing in along the sides and at southern part of the heliosphere. Somehow the magnetic field seems to be playing a dominant roll in these interactions, but we don't know it could produced these higher fluxes. We have to figure out what physics were are missing."

The solar wind streaks away from the sun in all directions at over a millions kilometers per hour. It creates a bubble in space around our solar system.

Spacecraft Detects Mysterious "Ribbon" at Edge of Solar System - universetoday .com
« Last Edit: December 06, 2009, 00:16:36 by electrobleme »

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Orion Nebula - Orion Source I
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2009, 17:38:29 »

Orion Nebula - Orion Source I


Quote
...reveals two jets of gas moving away from Source I - akin to the jets that stream from the poles of smaller stars. Material in these massive protostar jets would be surging at speeds up to 80,000 km/h. The streams of gas also appear to curve as they leave the disk, which suggests magnetic field lines are wrapping the streams of gas into a helix.

"Magnetic fields are supposed to be weak and unimportant to the birth process for massive stars," said Matthews. "But masers would not travel along gentle arcs unless they experience some sort of force - probably a magnetic force."
Video shows massive star forming

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Space Tornados or Birkeland currents?
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2009, 12:05:23 »

Space Tornados or Birkeland currents?


Quote
New Finding Shows Super-Huge Space Tornados Power the Auroras

...during Substorms show that electrical funnels which span a volume as large as Earth produce electrical currents exceeding 100,000 amperes. THEMIS recorded the extent and power of these electrical funnels as the probes passed through them during their orbit of Earth. Ground measurements showed that the space tornadoes channel the electrical current into the ionosphere to spark bright and colorful auroras on Earth.

Space tornadoes are rotating plasmas of hot, ionized gas flowing at speeds of more than a million miles per hour, far faster than the 200 m.p.h. winds of terrestrial tornadoes, according to Andreas Keiling, a research space physicist at the University of California, Berkeley’s Space Sciences Laboratory.

...Both terrestrial and space tornadoes consist of funnel-shaped structures. Space tornadoes, however, generate huge amounts of electrical currents inside the funnel. These currents flow along twisted magnetic field lines from space into the ionosphere where they power several processes, most notably bright auroras such as the Northern Lights, Keiling said.

New Finding Shows Super-Huge Space Tornados Power the Auroras
[/url]



Quote
Giant "Space Tornadoes" Spark Auroras on Earth

Whirling at more than a million miles per hour, these invisible, funnel-shaped solar windstorms carry electrical currents of more than a hundred thousand amps—roughly ten times that of an average lightning strike—scientists announced Thursday.

Spinning Up Auroras

As well as revealing the vast size and speed of these rotating plasmas of ionized gas, the team has pinpointed how space tornadoes kick-start the auroras we see on Earth.

Space Tornadoes: Fast, Furious—And Frequent

The new measurements show that a space tornado forms roughly every three hours and takes just one minute to reach Earth's ionosphere—our outermost atmospheric layer, between 62 and 250 miles (100 and 400 kilometers) above the ground.
Giant "Space Tornadoes" Spark Auroras on Earth

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The Double Helix Nebula or the Birkeland Current Nebula?
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2009, 10:52:56 »
Should the Double Helix Nebula be called the Birkland Nebula? - and dont mention the word electricity!



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Astronomers Report Unprecedented Double Helix Nebula Near Center of the Milky Way

Astronomers report an unprecedented elongated double helix nebula near the center of our Milky Way galaxy, using observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The part of the nebula the astronomers observed stretches 80 light years in length. The research is published March 16 in the journal Nature.

"We see two intertwining strands wrapped around each other as in a DNA molecule," said Mark Morris, a UCLA professor of physics and astronomy, and lead author. "Nobody has ever seen anything like that before in the cosmic realm. Most nebulae are either spiral galaxies full of stars or formless amorphous conglomerations of dust and gas — space weather. What we see indicates a high degree of order."

The double helix nebula is approximately 300 light years from the enormous black hole at the center of the Milky Way. (The Earth is more than 25,000 light years from the black hole at the galactic center.)

The Spitzer Space Telescope, an infrared telescope, is imaging the sky at unprecedented sensitivity and resolution; Spitzer's sensitivity and spatial resolution were required to see the double helix nebula clearly.

"We know the galactic center has a strong magnetic field that is highly ordered and that the magnetic field lines are oriented perpendicular to the plane of the galaxy," Morris said. "If you take these magnetic field lines and twist them at their base, that sends what is called a torsional wave up the magnetic field lines.

"You can regard these magnetic field lines as akin to a taut rubber band," Morris added. "If you twist one end, the twist will travel up the rubber band."

Offering another analogy, he said the wave is like what you see if you take a long loose rope attached at its far end, throw a loop, and watch the loop travel down the rope.


"That's what is being sent down the magnetic field lines of our galaxy," Morris said. "We see this twisting torsional wave propagating out. We don't see it move because it takes 100,000 years to move from where we think it was launched to where we now see it, but it's moving fast — about 1,000 kilometers per second — because the magnetic field is so strong at the galactic center — about 1,000 times stronger than where we are in the galaxy's suburbs."

A strong, large-scale magnetic field can affect the galactic orbits of molecular clouds by exerting a drag on them. It can inhibit star formation, and can guide a wind of cosmic rays away from the central region; understanding this strong magnetic field is important for understanding quasars and violent phenomena in a galactic nucleus. Morris will continue to probe the magnetic field at the galactic center in future research.

This magnetic field is strong enough to cause activity that does not occur elsewhere in the galaxy; the magnetic energy near the galactic center is capable of altering the activity of our galactic nucleus and by analogy the nuclei of many galaxies, including quasars, which are among the most luminous objects in the universe. All galaxies that have a well-concentrated galactic center may also have a strong magnetic field at their center, Morris said, but so far, ours is the only galaxy where the view is good enough to study it.

Morris has argued for many years that the magnetic field at the galactic center is extremely strong; the research published in Nature strongly supports that view.

The magnetic field at the galactic center, though 1,000 times weaker than the magnetic field on the sun, occupies such a large volume that it has vastly more energy than the magnetic field on the sun. It has the energy equivalent of 1,000 supernovae.

What launches the wave, twisting the magnetic field lines near the center of the Milky Way? Morris thinks the answer is not the monstrous black hole at the galactic center, at least not directly.

Orbiting the black hole like the rings of Saturn, several light years away, is a massive disk of gas called the circumnuclear disk; Morris hypothesizes that the magnetic field lines are anchored in this disk. The disk orbits the black hole approximately once every 10,000 years.

"Once every 10,000 years is exactly what we need to explain the twisting of the magnetic field lines that we see in the double helix nebula," Morris said.
Astronomers Report Unprecedented Double Helix Nebula Near Center of the Milky Way - physicalsciences .ucla.edu

Below is an actual mentioned and accepted Birkeland Current in space :)



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The Cygnus Loop has characteristics of an interstellar Birkeland current: (1) A plasma medium (2) Filamentation (3) Braiding, twisted "rope-like" structure. Credit: William P. Blair and Ravi Sankrit (Johns Hopkins University), NASA
The Cygnus Loop and description of Birkeland Currents in space

For more on Birkeland Currents in space from an Electric Universe Thoery point of view click here for the thunderbolts.info article Milky Way's Birkeland Current Falsifies "Black Hole" Assumption - The Serpent in the Sky (section near the bottom)

« Last Edit: December 06, 2009, 11:56:30 by electrobleme »

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Magnetic Power Revealed in Gamma-Ray Burst Jet

Well I never! Who would have thought it :) What a surprise. And will they find more magnetic fields in other cosmic jets (Birkeland Currents) and other space stuff? I bet my left testicle (the smaller one) they do.

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Magnetic Power Revealed in Gamma-Ray Burst Jet
12.09.09
 
A specialized camera on a telescope operated by U.K. astronomers from Liverpool has made the first measurement of magnetic fields in the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst (GRB). The result is reported in the Dec.10 issue of Nature magazine by the team of Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) astronomers who built and operate the telescope and its unique scientific camera, named RINGO.

The burst occurred January 2, 2009. NASA’s Swift satellite observed its position and immediately notified telescopes all over the world via the Internet. When it received the trigger from Swift, the robotic Liverpool Telescope on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands automatically swung to observe the burst. Its special camera employs a spinning disk of Polaroid -- similar to the material used in sunglasses.

"By observing how the brightness of the GRB varied as we spun the Polaroid, we could measure the magnetic field in the burst," explained Iain Steele, Director of the Liverpool Telescope.

"This important result gives us new insight into the physics of these remarkable objects and is a testament to the close collaboration between observers, theoreticians and technologists in the Liverpool and NASA Swift teams," added LMJU team leader Carole Mundell. "It's incredible to think that the GRB discovery and our measurement process – from first detection and notification by NASA's Swift satellite to the polarization measurement using RINGO on the Liverpool Telescope – took place completely automatically within less than three minutes and with no human intervention!"

"This breakthrough observation gives us the first measurement of magnetic fields in the afterglow of a GRB," said Swift lead scientist Neil Gehrels, Swift lead scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Gamma Ray Bursts form when the core of a massive star collapses or when two neutron stars merge together. The resulting explosions are the brightest events in the universe and vastly outshine entire galaxies containing hundreds of billions of stars. NASA’s Swift satellite sees about 100 of these events each year, triggering ground-based follow-up by observations across the globe.

Polarization is one of the least-observed properties in astronomy. This finding opens the door to understanding the role of magnetic fields in some of the most powerful events in the universe.

"These very interesting observations raise the possibility that gamma-ray bursts are not fireballs as usually presumed but are powered and collimated by an organized electromagnetic field," said Roger Blandford, Director of the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, California, commenting on the result's importance. "It will be very interesting to see if there are similarities in observations of other kinds of cosmic jets."
Magnetic Power Revealed in Gamma-Ray Burst Je

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JHU/APL Global Birkeland Currents Data Product System
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2009, 20:01:24 »
Earth's auroral Birkeland Currents !!!!!!

Birkeland currents and the Earth according to data from a JHU/APL research project sponsored by the National Science Foundation under the National Space Weather Program :)


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This page provides science community access to view and retrieve data products from the Point-Mosaic Auroral Imaging project. Point-Mosaic Auroral Imaging is a JHU/APL research project sponsored by the National Science Foundation under the National Space Weather Program to derive scientific information from the Iridium satellite system engineering magnetometer data. These data are relevant for study and monitoring of Earth’s auroral magnetic field aligned currents also called Birkeland currents.

The auroral Birkeland currents are the primary means of energy transport between Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere. The Iridium system is the first opportunity to continuously monitor this global scale current system by specifying its location, distribution, and intensity. The Iridium engineering magnetometers detect the signatures of these currents thus presenting an opportunity to advance not only our understanding of how this enormous current system behaves but also to monitor the dynamics of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system.
JHU/APL Global Birkeland Currents Data Product System - home page


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Earths auroral Birkeland Currents as observed by the Iridium satellites

Because the Iridium system orbits are polar, circular and low altitude (780 km) they are ideal for sampling the polar regions where electrical currents flow in association with the aurora.

Each satellite is equipped with a magnetometer having 48 nT resolution as part of the avionics which provides a means to detect the magnetic deflections associated with the auroral currents....

Figure 2. Schematic view of a satellite (green) passing through pairs of field aligned currents associated with each crossing of the auroral oval. Locally, large scale currents (blue) are approximately sheets of current which close in the underlying ionosphere. This current system produces the magnetic perturbations (red arrows) at the satellite altitude. It is these perturbations which are detected by the Iridium satellite system magnetometers.
JHU/APL Global Birkeland Currents Data Product System - Concept

JHU/APL Global Birkeland Currents Data Product System - home page



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Magnetized Local Fluff

"Using data from Voyager, we have discovered a strong magnetic field just outside the solar system," explains lead author Merav Opher, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from George Mason University. "This magnetic field holds the interstellar cloud together and solves the long-standing puzzle of how it can exist at all."

"...The Fluff is held at bay just beyond the edge of the solar system by the sun's magnetic field, which is inflated by solar wind into a magnetic bubble more than 10 billion km wide. Called the heliosphere..."

Is the energised magnetized gas (electrically charged plasma) really 6000C or is that a measurement of energy but it has to be interpreted as heat because you cant have that amount of energy in a cloud of plamsa that size? In a Gravity Universe that is. If it is its actual temperature then how does rarified gas in space, not near a star get to and remain at those temperatures?

If it was an Electric Universe then you might expect this "Local Fluff" to be have filaments and show other EU signs. But nothing electrical ;)


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December 23, 2009: The solar system is passing through an interstellar cloud that physics says should not exist. In the Dec. 24th issue of Nature, a team of scientists reveal how NASA's Voyager spacecraft have solved the mystery.

"Using data from Voyager, we have discovered a strong magnetic field just outside the solar system," explains lead author Merav Opher, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from George Mason University. "This magnetic field holds the interstellar cloud together and solves the long-standing puzzle of how it can exist at all."

The discovery has implications for the future when the solar system will eventually bump into other, similar clouds in our arm of the Milky Way galaxy.

Astronomers call the cloud we're running into now the Local Interstellar Cloud or "Local Fluff" for short. It's about 30 light years wide and contains a wispy mixture of hydrogen and helium atoms at a temperature of 6000 C. The existential mystery of the Fluff has to do with its surroundings. About 10 million years ago, a cluster of supernovas exploded nearby, creating a giant bubble of million-degree gas. The Fluff is completely surrounded by this high-pressure supernova exhaust and should be crushed or dispersed by it.

"The observed temperature and density of the local cloud do not provide enough pressure to resist the 'crushing action' of the hot gas around it," says Opher.

So how does the Fluff survive? The Voyagers have found an answer.

"Voyager data show that the Fluff is much more strongly magnetized than anyone had previously suspected—between 4 and 5 microgauss*," says Opher. "This magnetic field can provide the extra pressure required to resist destruction."

NASA's two Voyager probes have been racing out of the solar system for more than 30 years. They are now beyond the orbit of Pluto and on the verge of entering interstellar space—but they are not there yet.

"The Voyagers are not actually inside the Local Fluff," says Opher. "But they are getting close and can sense what the cloud is like as they approach it."

The Fluff is held at bay just beyond the edge of the solar system by the sun's magnetic field, which is inflated by solar wind into a magnetic bubble more than 10 billion km wide. Called the "heliosphere," this bubble acts as a shield that helps protect the inner solar system from galactic cosmic rays and interstellar clouds. The two Voyagers are located in the outermost layer of the heliosphere, or "heliosheath," where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas.

Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath in Dec. 2004; Voyager 2 followed almost 3 years later in Aug. 2007. These crossings were key to Opher et al's discovery.

The size of the heliosphere is determined by a balance of forces: Solar wind inflates the bubble from the inside while the Local Fluff compresses it from the outside. Voyager's crossings into the heliosheath revealed the approximate size of the heliosphere and, thus, how much pressure the Local Fluff exerts. A portion of that pressure is magnetic and corresponds to the ~5 microgauss Opher's team has reported in Nature.

The fact that the Fluff is strongly magnetized means that other clouds in the galactic neighborhood could be, too. Eventually, the solar system will run into some of them, and their strong magnetic fields could compress the heliosphere even more than it is compressed now. Additional compression could allow more cosmic rays to reach the inner solar system, possibly affecting terrestrial climate and the ability of astronauts to travel safely through space. On the other hand, astronauts wouldn't have to travel so far because interstellar space would be closer than ever. These events would play out on time scales of tens to hundreds of thousands of years, which is how long it takes for the solar system to move from one cloud to the next.

"There could be interesting times ahead!" says Opher.

Voyager Makes an Interstellar Discovery - science.nasa .gov
« Last Edit: December 29, 2009, 02:17:02 by electrobleme »

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What happens next? What is not mentioned next?
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2009, 15:03:52 »

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All previous mathematical models wrong?

“This research will challenge current thinking among astronomers,” Dr Crocker says. “For the last 30 years there has been considerable uncertainty of the exact value of the magnetic field in the centre of the Milky Way. The strength of this field enters into most calculations in astronomy, since almost all of space is magnetised,” he says.

“If our Galactic centre’s magnetic field is stronger than we thought, this raises additional questions of how it got so strong when fields in the early universe are, in contrast, quite weak."


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An international research project involving the University of Adelaide has revealed that the magnetic field in the centre of the Milky Way is at least 10 times stronger than the rest of the Galaxy.

The evidence is significant because it gives astronomers a lower limit on the magnetic field, an important factor in calculating a whole range of astronomical data.

Researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, the University of Adelaide, Monash University and the United States have published their findings in Nature this week.

Dr Roland Crocker, the lead author, and Dr David Jones both worked on the project while based at Monash University and the University of Adelaide’s School of Chemistry and Physics. The two physicists are now based at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany.

“This research will challenge current thinking among astronomers,” Dr Crocker says. “For the last 30 years there has been considerable uncertainty of the exact value of the magnetic field in the centre of the Milky Way. The strength of this field enters into most calculations in astronomy, since almost all of space is magnetised,” he says.

Dr Jones says the findings will affect diverse fields, from star formation theory to cosmology.

“If our Galactic centre’s magnetic field is stronger than we thought, this raises additional questions of how it got so strong when fields in the early universe are, in contrast, quite weak. We know now that more than 10% of the Galaxy’s magnetic energy is concentrated in less than 0.1% of its volume, right at its centre,” he says.

Dr Jones completed his PhD at Adelaide, studying the Galactic Centre magnetic field under the supervision of Dr Raymond Protheroe, Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Adelaide, and Dr Crocker, a former postdoctoral researcher at the University.

“The Milky Way just glows in radio waves and in gamma-rays produced by collisions of energetic particles, and is brightest near its centre. Knowing the magnetic field there helps us understand the source of the radio and gamma-rays better,” says Dr Protheroe.
Scientists reveal Milky Way's magnetic attraction - physorg .com