Poll

surprise !?

"Nobody expected that.  I don't know a single person that did.  We were astonished, just astonished"
0 (0%)
"I just about fell off my chair"..."it was surprising to find rocks that had not been remixed inside the mantle for two billion years."
1 (50%)
"Isn't that the most outrageous thing you could imagine? It truly is like something out of science fiction."
0 (0%)
"The first reaction that I think all of us had was, this is ridiculous,"
0 (0%)
They also reaffirmed their earlier conclusion that Mercury has a liquid core whose motions drive a dipolar magnetic field and whose slow solidification results in surface faulting as a the whole planet shrinks.  All these results came from just one flyby
1 (50%)

Total Members Voted: 2

Voting closed: January 22, 2010, 01:20:32

Author Topic: Surprised science - a good theory predicts...  (Read 66432 times)

electrobleme

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2 planets (or more) orbiting 2 suns orbiting each other
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2012, 03:15:09 »


2 planets (or more) orbiting 2 suns orbiting each other

A pair of planets circling a pair of stars was not predicted and has surprised science and scientists but its back to that famous drawing board. And they now expect to find more planets orbiting the 2 stars orbiting each other.

They will modify the theories that did not predict this but they wont change how they got to the main basic foundations. Of course not, why should they as it so successfully predicted ...

Quote

Greg Laughlin, professor of astrophysics and planetary science at the University of California, said the discovery could turn our understanding of how planets appeared after the Big Bang on its head.

"This is an amazing discovery," he told SPACE.com "These planets are very difficult to form using the currently accepted paradigm, and I believe that theorists will be going back to the drawing board to try to improve our understanding of how planets are assembled."

It was often assumed before that that a system of multiple planets would struggle to exist under the gravity of two stars at the same time, with planets either pulling away from the orbit or crashing into each other.

Now, scientists are expecting to find more such systems.
Two Planets, Two Suns: NASA discovery could help find alien life | rt.com

electrobleme

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Water on the moon. Surprised and exactly as not predicted
« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2012, 19:42:02 »
Water on the moon. Surprised and exactly as not predicted

Water on the moon? Don't be silly. Even after looking at the moon rocks for 40 or 50 years no water on the moon. Whoops. Exactly as not predicted by science. They now think it may come from the interaction of the moon with the 'solar wind' which is a plasma flow which you might think of as an electrical current.

Which would help to explain why there are at least 2 speeds for the solar wind that we know of and why the solar wind accelerates the further away it gets from the sun. Perhaps the sun and our solar system are acting as a natural CERN?

Quote
The traditional view that the Moon was entirely dry has been proven incorrect in recent years, with growing evidence that icy drops of water can be found on its surface.

In 2009, a Nasa satellite slammed into a crater and threw up a plume which scientists found contained an unexpectedly high amount of ice, and small amounts of water have also been found in powder and rock in the Moon's outer layer.

But although the discoveries have proven the existence of water, the problem which has continued to baffle scientists is where it came from.

... Solar wind is a flow of particles continually flowing away from the Sun. The Earth's magnetic field deflects them away from our planet, but the Moon has no such protection.
Water particles found on surface of the moon, scientists say | telegraph.co.uk