Volcanic explosions – unique electrical activity

electric volcanoes source energy power electric universe theory eu lightning dischargesDirty thunderstorms can create lightning associated with volcanoes, as suggested for the volcanic lightning photographed at the Halemaumau Crater in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Dust (rock particles) rubbing together is suggested as creating the awesome amounts of static electricity to produce these electric discharges, similar to lighting from thunderstorms - dirty thunderstorms.

But an old United States Geological Survey into the electrical activity of an Alaskan volcano eruption groups the lightning discharges into 3 different types.

It also suggests that volcano eruptions have a unique electric activity not observed in normal thunder and lightning storms - these they term as vent discharges.

Because we saw similar enhancements during five other eruptive events, we conclude that the signals are due to electrical events at the vent during explosive eruptions. We will refer to these as vent discharges.
Lightning and Electrical Activity during the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano | Link to PDF

Dirty lightning from dirty thunderstorms

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The cloud seen above the crater is a plume of volcanic ash produced by the volatile lake of lava within.

Lightning can be produced by volcanic activity, according to United States Geological Survey scientists, in a phenomenon known as dirty thunderstorms or volcanic lightning.

But that's not what this particular photograph captures, said Janet Babb, a USGS geologist with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

This lightning strike is "strictly a weather phenomenon -- it has nothing to do with the ash being emitted by Kilauea," she said, emphasizing that the lightning is much farther from the ash than it appears in the photo.

The ash and the lightning are unrelated occurrences, but the addition of the fiery glow of the lava makes for quite an image.
Lightning Strikes Over Volcano For 'Once-In-A-Lifetime' Photo | Huffington Post

Volcanic lightning due to volcanic ash

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Lightning is often seen around volcanic eruptions and their resulting ash plumes. One common type results when individual particles of ash (actually broken rock) violently rub against each other, generating huge amounts of static electricity. Even though each discharge lasts only a few milliseconds, temperatures inside and near the bolt can approach a hellish 30,000°C—more than enough to melt fine bits of ash, researchers say.
Flash glass: Lightning inside volcanic ash plumes create glassy spherules | Science Mag

Electric volcanic lightning - 3 types

Lightning and Electrical Activity during the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano electric volcanoes
A previous United States Geological Survey report on volcanic lightning suggests there may be at least 3 different 'types' of volcanic lightning. Or that its electric properties varies depending on where the lightning discharges.

The report is a fascinating study on the electrical properties surrounding a volcano eruption and its lightning discharges, with lots more information that can be interpreted using the Electric Universe theory (EU theory).

The suggested Electric Universe origin of Mt Augustine volcanic lightning in Alaska has already been mentioned in a Thunderbolts Picture of The Day.

The USGS report into the Augustine Volcano lightning and its electrical activity also mentions 2 different phases. They divide the volcano lightning into 3 different types - vent discharge lightning, near vent lightning and the volcanoes plume lightning.

Lightning and other electrical activity were measured during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. We found two phases of the activity, the explosive phase corresponding to the explosive eruptions and the plume phase. We classified the lightning into three types, vent discharges, near-vent lightning, and plume lightning. Vent discharges are small, 10 to 100 m sparks, that occur at rate as great as 10,000 s-1 at the mouth of the volcano during the energetic explosive eruptions. The vent discharges were observed six different times. Near-vent lightning appears to develop upward from the volcanic cone into the developing column during explosions. This lightning is small, in the range of 1 to 7 km, and short, 0.01 to 0.1 s. The behavior of the near-vent lightning indicates an overall positive charge in the ejecta. The plume lightning resembled intracloud thunderstorm lightning. Often it was branched, spanned more than 10 km, and lasted more than 0.5 s.
Lightning and Electrical Activity during the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano | Link to PDF

Electric volcano explosions - unique electrical activity

Lightning and Electrical Activity during the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano electric volcanoes

This indicates that the explosive-phase radiation originated at relatively low altitude at or slightly above Augustine’s summit vent. The signals from the vent would have been more strongly attenuated at Anchor Point. The radiated source powers ranged from about 0 dBW up to 30 dBW (1 to 1,000 W) in the receiver passband, typical of values observed for ordinary lightning (Thomas and others, 2001). Because we saw similar enhancements during five other eruptive events, we conclude that the signals are due to electrical events at the vent during explosive eruptions. We will refer to these as vent discharges.

We have not observed similar electrical activity in thunderstorms (we have observed many thunderstorms with the same equipment and have not seen similar electrical signals). This type of electrical activity appears to be unique to volcanic explosions.
Explosive Eruption at 2024 AKST on January 27, 2006 - Lightning and Electrical Activity during the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano | Link to PDF