Erupting the magma chamber paradigm

The end of localised magma chambers being the only natural power source for volcano eruptions? Natural electrochemistry processes.

The formation, storage and chemical differentiation of magma in the Earth’s crust is of fundamental importance in igneous geology and volcanology.

Recent data are challenging the high-melt-fraction ‘magma chamber’ paradigm that has underpinned models of crustal magmatism for over a century, suggesting instead that magma is normally stored in low-melt-fraction ‘mush reservoirs’...

However, many common features of crustal magmatism have not yet been explained by either the ‘chamber’ or ‘mush reservoir’ concepts
Chemical differentiation, cold storage and remobilization of magma in the Earth’s crust | Nature

electromagnetic volcanos magma chambers

Electromagnetic geology transforming material into molten rock.

Our understanding of volcanic processes, including those leading to the largest eruptions, has been based on magma being stored in liquid-filled ‘magma’ chambers – large, underground caves full of liquid magma. However, these have never been observed...

Co-author Professor Stephen Sparks, from the University of Bristol’s School of Earth Sciences, said: “A major mystery about volcanoes is that they were thought to be underlain by large chambers of molten rock. Such magma chambers, however, were very difficult to find...

the new mush reservoir model can help explain other phenomena in volcanic systems, such as how the magma chemical composition evolves and how much older crystals can be erupted within younger magmas.
Volcanoes fed by ‘mush’ reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers | Imperial College London

electricity volcano magma chambers lightning

Transforming and transmutation of electrochemical elements including mechanisms such as electrical plasma discharges.

Electric (Universe) lightning and volcano

Plasma lighting discharge to or from the volcano? Electricity flowing both ways in natures geomagnetic Electric Universe? Electric circuits.
geomagnetic lightning volcano

impressive fusillade from Sakurajima volcano, on the island of Kyushu, Japan, as viewed on the night of February 24, 2013. Throughout the past four years, Sakurajima has been in a state of elevated activity. During the first two months of 2013, approximately 200 explosive events were recorded. On occasion, an eruption is accompanied by lightning.

As can be seen on the picture, the lightning seems to emanate from near the crater rather than from a cloud above the volcano's 3,665 ft (1,117 m) summit. This phenomenon isn't fully understood. Our small exploration group noticed that the flashes appeared in the first seconds following very powerful explosions.
Eruption of Sakurajima | Earth Science Picture of the Day