Antimatter plasma filaments or Birkeland currents?

Antimatter plasma or Birkeland plasma filaments in an electromagnetic universe?

Antimatter plasma Birkeland filaments currents

Mysterious radiation emitted from pulsars - like this one shown leaving a long tail of debris as it races through the Milky Way - have puzzled astronomers for decades.

"These fields are so strong, and they twist and reconnect so violently, that they essentially apply Einstein's equation of E = mc2 and create matter and antimatter out of energy," said Professor Luis Silva at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon, Portugal. Together, the electrons and positrons are thought to form a super-heated form of matter known as a plasma around a pulsar.

But the exact conditions necessary to produce a plasma containing positrons remain unclear. Scientists also still do not understand why the radio waves emitted by the plasma around pulsars have properties similar to light in a laser beam – a wave structure known as coherence.
Antimatter plasma reveals secrets of deep space signals | phys.org

Antimatter or Birkeland plasma filaments

50 year old puzzling questions with possible answers from plasma cosmology and Electric Universe theories?
Birkeland currents
STEVE's

Antimatter plasma filaments STEVES

Mysterious radiation emitted from distant corners of the galaxy could finally be explained with efforts to recreate a unique state of matter that blinked into existence in the first moments after the Big Bang. For 50 years, astronomers have puzzled over strange radio waves and gamma rays thrown out from the spinning remnants of dead stars called pulsars.

Researchers believe that these enigmatic, highly-energetic pulses of radiation are produced by bursts of electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. The universe was briefly filled with these superheated, electrically charged particles in the seconds that followed the Big Bang before all antimatter vanished, taking the positrons with it. But astrophysicists think the conditions needed to forge positrons may still exist in the powerful electric and magnetic fields generated around pulsars.
Antimatter plasma reveals secrets of deep space signals | phys.org