Very low frequency superbolts of lightning

Super bolts of lightning, very very frightening if you live near an Electric Universe triple point of sea, air and land.

A University of Washington study maps the location and timing of superbolts - bolts that release electrical energy of more than 1 million Joules, or a thousand times more energy than the average lightning bolt, in the very low frequency range in which lightning is most active. Results show that superbolts tend to hit the Earth in a fundamentally different pattern from regular lightning, for reasons that are not yet fully understood.

It's very unexpected and unusual where and when the very big strokes occur, said lead author Robert Holzworth, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences who has been tracking lightning for almost two decades.
Lightning superbolts form over oceans from November to February | University of Washington

superbolts of lightning

The junction of electrically charged salt water, atmosophere and planet material is not a surprise in a natural electromagnetic circuit. Potential differences, resistance etc are part of the Earth's global electric circuit.

The Global Atmospheric Electric Circuit

The new paper shows that superbolts are most common in the Mediterranean Sea, the northeast Atlantic and over the Andes, with lesser hotspots east of Japan, in the tropical oceans and off the tip of South Africa. Unlike regular lightning, the superbolts tend to strike over water.

superbolts of lightning

Ninety percent of lightning strikes occur over land, but superbolts happen mostly over the water going right up to the coast. In fact, in the northeast Atlantic Ocean you can see Spain and England's coasts nicely outlined in the maps of superbolt distribution.

superbolts of lightning

The average stroke energy over water is greater than the average stroke energy over land - we knew that, but that's for the typical energy levels. We were not expecting this dramatic difference.

Earths global electric weather circuit pressure systems

The time of year for superbolts also doesn't follow the rules for typical lightning. Regular lightning hits in the summertime - the three major so-called lightning chimneys for regular bolts coincide with summer thunderstorms over the Americas, sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. But superbolts, which are more common in the Northern Hemisphere, strike both hemispheres between the months of November and February.

The reason for the pattern is still mysterious.
Lightning superbolts form over oceans from November to February | University of Washington

superbolts of lightning
Superbolts map displaying energy and location.