Out on a limb

drepanosaurus divergent evolution convergent evolution Out on an evolutionary limb with divergent evolution and convergent evolution theories producing similar physical characteristic?

The Drepanosaurus fossil shows a relatively massive and unique forearm for tetrapods. But this large utensil is also present in modern day anteaters including the pygmy anteater.

The tetrapod forelimb is one of the most versatile structures in vertebrate evolution, having been co-opted for an enormous array of functions. However, the structural relationships between the bones of the forelimb have remained largely unchanged throughout the 375 million year history of Tetrapoda ... the distorted forelimb elements of the Drepanosaurus type specimen suggest a construction utterly unlike the standard tetrapod condition
Extreme Modification of the Tetrapod Forelimb in a Triassic Diapsid Reptile

Is this a combination of convergent evolution and divergent evolution - condivergent evolution, diconvergent evolution?
drepanosaurus divergent evolution convergent evolution forelimb anteaters

This condition has similarities to living “hook-and-pull” digging mammals and demonstrates that specialized, modern ecological roles had developed during the Triassic Period, over 200 million years ago.
Extreme Modification of the Tetrapod Forelimb in a Triassic Diapsid Reptile

Scientists say the creature defies the convention on how reptiles evolved and flourished.
Strange reptile fossil puzzles scientists | BBC

If animals adapt to changes or challenges in their environment and evolve extra special or different body parts and functions - through long term trial, error, death, life - then should there be more tetrapod fossils with varying types of forelimbs?

The forelimbs of tetrapods are known for their versatility, used to walk, dig, fly or swim. However, the basic plan of the forelimb has stayed much the same throughout 375 million years of evolution. "The arm of tetrapod animals almost always follows some very consistent rules," Dr Pritchard said ... "So all of these consistent patterns that we see across a huge range of tetrapods, regardless of their ecology, regardless of their ancestry, are violated by this animal"
Strange reptile fossil puzzles scientists | BBC

Or some form of electromagnetic evolution effecting both types of life forms?