Make mine a double

Cheers, make mine a double.

binariesThe origin of binary stars has long been one of the central problems of astronomy. One of the main questions is how stellar mass affects the tendency to be multiple.

... CfA astronomer Sarah Sadavoy and her colleague used combined observations from a large radio wavelength survey of young stars in the Perseus cloud with submillimeter observations of the natal dense core material around these stars to identify twenty-four multiple systems

... They found that most of the embedded binaries are located near the centers of their dust cores, indicative of their still being young enough to have not drifted away. About half of the binaries are in elongated core structures, and they conclude that the initial cores were also elongated structures. After modeling their findings, they argue that the most likely scenarios are the ones predicting that all stars, both single and binaries, form in widely separated binary pair systems

... One of their most significant major conclusions is that each dusty core of material is likely to be the birthplace of two stars, not the single star usually modeled. This means that there are probably twice as many stars being formed per core than is generally believed.
The origin of binary stars | Physorg